I Think Geoffrey Fieger is Running For President In 2020

And he’ll do much better than people expect

Jeffrey Fieger is a blowhard and a hot head but I don’t hate him. He wouldn’t be my first choice to unseat Donald Trump in 2020. I’d prefer to see a woman have that honor — specifically, I’d love to see Elizabeth Warren or Tulsi Gabbard top the next Democratic ticket. But this morning when I saw his latest ad on Detroit TV I had an epiphany: Jeffrey Fieger’s not the worst choice, either.

I didn’t see his most recent TV ad on Youtube — but if you take a look at this one from about a month ago, you’ll understand that my brain isn’t full of plastic peanuts.

Geoffrey Fieger, who brutally lost his bid for Michigan’s governorship against incumbent John Engler in 1998 wants to unseat Donald Trump — and he has a better chance of doing it than some of the more likely Democratic nominees.

I’d prefer we didn’t have blowhards in the White House, even when I agree, more-or-less, with their policy positions. But if 2016 taught us anything, it showed us that the American people have a much greater affinity for theatrical blowhards than many of us ever imagined.

Yes, Geoffrey Fieger is a blowhard. But he’s our blowhard. And he would eat Donald Trump’s lunch and mop the floor with him in a head-to-head debate.

I don’t agree with Fieger on everything but I observed his charisma up-close and personally when he was running for governor and I was covering politics for the Battle Creek Enquirer. We were sitting knee to knee on folding chairs in a cramped corner of a Steel Worker’s Union hall when some hubub broke out at a rally outside unbeknownst to us. Our interview went on for an hour and then he took the stage, riled up the crowd and went off to his next campaign stop.

I was almost done with the article I was writing about his positions on a range of policy issues when I received a phone call from an elderly reader who had attended the rally. Back in those still-somewhat-golden days of paper newspapers, readers called reporters directly with news tips or opinions. I knew the elderly gentleman on the phone pretty well.

“I just had to call to say something about what went on,” he said sincerely. “I just don’t think what happened at the rally was right.”

He went on to tell me that a Steel Worker had been arrested for beating up a GOP member who had been following Fieger around to his rallies with a sign that said something to the affect of “Geoffrey Fieger hates Jesus.”

“I just think that was very anti-Semetic, don’t you?” the elderly gentleman reader continued. He said the guy with the sign was chanting and really asking for it.

It was one of the few “stop the press” moments I’d been involved with in my career. In this case the press hadn’t quite started running but the entire front page was ready and the headline for my story had been written. The editors were just waiting for me to finish my story which was about a sentence away from being done — all 24 inches of it.

I told the editors about the fight that had broken out while I was interviewing Fieger and that a Steel Worker had been arrested for assaulting this guy who was following him around chanting about how he hated Jesus.

The paper had to go to press. I had about 15 minutes to get the new story in print. That meant a call to the police department, a call to the GOP spokesperson and a call to Fieger. Miraculously, it all worked out, as things usually did on deadline back in the good old paper newspaper days. Doubting whether or not I would be able to get much of the story, the copy editors filled the inside jump space with an Associated Press wire story. I had about 10 inches on the front page to let readers know about the fight.

When I reached Fieger on his cell phone and told him what had happened he laughed. It was news to him. I asked him what he thought about it.

“Well,” Fieger said. “I guess now we know what happens when you try to pick a fight with a Steel Worker. You get the shit kicked out of you!”

Associated Press picked up the story and Michigan media made hay out of it for days. I don’t remember writing a single word about Fieger’s political ideas — at least not any that made it into the newspaper.

After I had the epiphany this morning that Fieger is running for president, I said so in a status update on Facebook. A few people said he could never win, he couldn’t even win Michigan’s governorship in 1998, they said.

Well, let me tell you something. This is not 1998. And that race for Michigan’s governorship was a whole different ballgame.

For as big of a blowhard as he truly is, I’ve always admired Fieger for running against incumbent Governor John Engler who was a shoe-in to win. No Democrat could have won the election that year. And if you think Michigan Governor Rick Snyder is the worst.governor.ever you weren’t around for Engler. Don’t even get me started on that…

Yes, Geoffrey Fieger is running for president in 2020 and I think he’ll do pretty well. I don’t expect him to get the Democratic nomination but there’s a possibility he might. If he doesn’t win the nomination and the Democrats pick another establishment candidate to go up against Trump in 2020, I’d expect him to stay in the race as an independent. Afterall Geoffrey Fieger is a true blowhard and he doesn’t have the manners Bernie Sanders has.

If he doesn’t win the nomination and the Democrats put forth an outside-the-establishment candidate such as Elizabeth Warren or Tulsi Gabbard, I’d expect him to step down and endorse the ticket and fight for it.

Here’s the thing about Fieger. He’s a total blowhard but not an unscrupulous one. He wants our side to win.

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