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Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Another day, another coding challenge. That mantra has been colouring my life since I’ve written last. And I’m happy about it. Each day I’m solving new problems and strengthening my coding skills. I’m much more comfortable with core array methods and manipulating data types in order to reach a desired outcome.

However, you won’t see some of the other coding muscles I’ve put to work over the past few weeks here. I feel increasingly comfortable with the concept of Promises, the this keyword (everyone’s favourite), ES6 features, and making GET requests. I’ve also started a React udemy course which has been fun, especially after focusing on vanilla JS for weeks. …


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Photo by Kevin Ku on Unsplash

I’ve been reviewing JavaScript fundamentals since graduating from Juno College’s Bootcamp over two weeks ago. Books, code-alongs, and practice exercises have all been staples in my review routine. I’ve noticed a significant improvement in how quickly I’m able to pseudo through steps in writing JS. My problem-solving skills have grown as well. I’m going to share two practice exercises and how I solved them in this post.

I believe sharing written solutions can be yet another way to improve. By reviewing your own code, reasoning through your steps, and communicating them for an audience, you learn more deeply. Anyone who has taught or mentored another knows that you understand the material better as a result of communicating it. In addition, if people read my solutions and provide feedback to improve or code differently, then I improve as well! …


“Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” — Harold Abelson

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My life in code is still young. Months old, really. But I’ve come to realize Harold Abelson’s quote over this short period. It’s part of a broader area of coding that I’ve been giving some thought to — how programmer’s think.

Maybe it’s the full-time commitment to learning code. Maybe it’s the fact that I’m digging deeper into JavaScript than ever before. Maybe it’s out of necessity. Whatever the reason, I believe I’m learning more about how programmer’s think and seeing more of it in myself. …


A narrow, rocky path through the wooded nature
A narrow, rocky path through the wooded nature

“Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world.”- John Muir

I feel the essence that John Muir’s quote captures every time I step into nature. It’s the sense of stillness. It’s the labour of trekking through land or across water. It’s the creation of a new self. This past weekend was another opportunity to feel all of that.

Myself and three close friends hiked 90 minutes into Algonquin Park along the Highlands Trail. It was a short hike to a beautiful site on Provoking Lake. I’ve been doing the weekend, outdoors, drop-out and connect camping thing for some years now. Not a pro, but definitely seasoned. And this weekend was much like others. …


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I came across two helpful reminders early last week. I started my “official” journey into front-end web development at HackerYou, but in reality my interest in code began earlier. The reminders helped to confirm why this is something that became an interest to being with. In other words, they were a compass pointing me back to why I’ve chosen the web. I believe they still are.

The web I refer to is of course the internet. I’m specifically concerned about my contributions to it as a web developer. Now there are several jobs out there with abstract titles — associate analyst, lead partner, director of management of managing managers. Not so in this industry. A web developer develops the internet (duh!). And they can do so in several ways, most of which I’m currently unaware. Same goes as to why one is a developer to begin with. This week served up two reminders that I think are the foundation to why I’m a web developer. …

About

Paul Andrews

web developer || Toronto || “The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart.”

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