Packing and Labelling of Technology Products

Idea Journal #2

History of Cartography

Cartography, or mapmaking, has been an integral part of the human history for thousands of years. From cave paintings to ancient maps of Babylon, Greece, and Asia, through the Age of Exploration, and on into the 21st century, people have created and used maps as essential tools to help them define, explain, and navigate their way through the world. Maps began as two-dimensional drawings but can also adopt three-dimensional shapes (globes, models) and be stored in purely numerical forms. — Wikipedia

History of Mapmaking from 100–1600

Packaging And Labeling

Packaging is the technology of enclosing or protecting products for distribution, storage, sale, and use. Packaging also refers to the process of designing, evaluating, and producing packages. Packaging can be described as a coordinated system of preparing goods for transport, warehousing, logistics, sale, and end use. Packaging contains, protects, preserves, transports, informs, and sells.[1] In many countries it is fully integrated into government, business, institutional, industrial, and personal use. — Wikipedia

Ancient Era

The first packages used the natural materials available at the time: baskets of reeds, wineskins (bota bags), wooden boxes, pottery vases, ceramic amphorae, wooden barrels, woven bags, etc. Processed materials were used to form packages as they were developed: for example, early glass and bronze vessels. The study of old packages is an important aspect of archaeology.

The earliest recorded use of paper for packaging dates back to 1035, when a Persian traveler visiting markets in Cairo noted that vegetables, spices and hardware were wrapped in paper for the customers after they were sold.[2]


Why Your Product’s Packaging Is as Important as the Product Itself

Link

  1. Know your demographic. Stark white and robin’s-egg blue won’t work for every brand. Consider Lowe’s Home Improvement and Home Depot. Their rugged brands speak for themselves with distinctive, masculine colors. Don’t be afraid to go bold.
  2. Make cheap packaging look chic and personalized. Good packaging doesn’t have to be expensive. Stephanieverafter, an online hair accessory boutique, packages its bows on simple cards in muted colors with stylish typography. It’s an inexpensive solution that gives each item a high-end feel.
  3. Make the package part of the experience. Part of the reason it’s so fun to unbox a new Apple product is that its packaging reflects the sleek, user-friendly experience of the product inside. One startup that’s mastered this is Back to the Roots, which produces kits to get kids and parents interested in growing their own food. Its mushroom kit’s kid-friendly packaging is designed to jump off the shelf and convey the fun, hands-on experience the brand provides.
  4. Consider eco-friendly options. Packaging that’s recyclable or reusable is always a reason for a consumer to choose your brand over your competitor’s. In fact, 52 percent of people around the world make purchase decisions partially due to packaging that shows a brand making a positive social and environmental impact.Puma has made great strides with its eco-friendly packaging that doubles as a reusable walking billboard for its brand. There are plenty of creative ways to go easy on the earth and differentiate your brand in the process.

Environmentally Friendly Packaging Design


Simple Label Design


Guidelines for Shipping Container Labeling

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