David Astbury Should Be Moved Back Up Front

Richmond has had an incredible start to this season, winning all three games thus far however; there side is still not perfect and their forward line is something they need to work on, with David Astbury having the potential to help.

Yes, the tigers forward line hasn’t been completely poor, with small forwards Dan Butler, Jason Castagna, Sam Lloyed, Ben Leneon and Daniel Rioli all providing a level of spark and class, any successful side needs.

However, this cannot be said for the Tiger’s tall forwards, with Jack Riewoldt only kicking four goals in three games, and Todd Elton and Ben Griffiths remaining goalless.

If Richmond is serious about making the finals this season then they need something more from their tall targets up front. So whom do they call in next to fix this? David Astbury is a possibility.

Asbury has managed to kick only 8 goals from 63 games however; this includes a 3-goal haul against Melbourne on his debut.

What many seem to forget is that Astbury was recruited as a forward back in 2009 with pick 35 however, has spent the bulk of his career at the opposite end.

A plague of injuries and ordinary form made Astbury a fringe player in the Tiger’s back-line for many years, yet a solid season in 2016 and so far this year has almost cemented him a spot in defence.

Despite this Richmond is still in desperate need of a genuine second tall option in attack, with Astbury possibly being the man for the job.

The Tiger’s have other tall defenders such as the experienced Jake Batchelor, who is yet to make a senior appearance this year, who can potentially hold a position down back while Astbury is moved forward.

As it’s only early days in the season so far, there is still time for either Griffiths or Elton to start performing. Although, if they are unable to do so then Richmond must look for another option, with Astbury potentially being that option.


Originally published at fulltimehq.wordpress.com on April 13, 2017.

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