5 best TED talks about food

This gives you 5*20 min that will change your perception on how we will eat in the future. More articles about Food Tech on www.foodtech.media

If the findings Lisa is talking about would hold it’s promise. The ability to re-cycle carbon dioxide via amino acids to create protein rich edible food. This research in my view would be granted the Nobel Prize in Biology sooner than later. Well, yes, there are no Nobel Prize to be won in Biology…yet
/Peter Ingman

Starting with TED talk no 5:

No 5)

Great talk about responsibility for our future by being non-confirmist. My friend Ron Finley

No 4)

Caleb Harper, a well-knowned scientist within ag tech held this speech at the ordinary TED conference in Geneva in 2015.

What if we could grow delicious, nutrient-dense food, indoors anywhere in the world? Caleb Harper, director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab, wants to change the food system by connecting growers with technology. Get to know Harper’s “food computers” and catch a glimpse of what the future of farming might look like.

https://www.ted.com/talks/caleb_harper_this_computer_will_grow_your_food_in_the_future

This talk has been seen by 1,6 MSEK viewers.

No 3)

The third one being a talk about how we can use a group of cropes to better meet the demand from a growing global population. Mrs Dyson gives the solution, super charged carbon recyclers, an over-looked and under studied type of microbes.

I especially liked this talk just because of Lisa Dyson’s passionate view on the success we can reach. The cropes she is talking about could be found if we use microbes that is found everywhere. The trick is to widen the search of bacteria which Lisa points out is the neccessary building blocks of all life on earth. Lisa points to a lengthy but great article in “The New Yorker” describing this.

More than half the cells in the human body are microbial, and many of them exist as biological dark matter[1]

https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_dyson_a_forgotten_space_age_technology_could_change_how_we_grow_food

If the findings Lisa is talking about would hold it’s promise to re-cycle carbon dioxide via amino acids to create protein rich edible food, this research in my view would be granted the Nobel Prize in Biology sooner than later. Well, yes, there are no Nobel Prize to be won in Biology (why?, you can find out here), only in Chemistry or even Physics. Maybe someone here would be keen to start an alternative Nobel Prize for this finding.

No 2)

In 2010, a cancer researcher, William Li, pronounced that we could eat in a new way to kill cancer. He of course means that there is ways to steer how we consume food while being ill in cancer.

Eating cancer-fighting foods that cut off the supply lines and beat cancer at its own game.

https://www.ted.com/talks/william_li

Eat to Beat Cancer website offers a lot of receipes with food that they mean is better to eat, not only for cancer patients.

https://www.eattobeat.org/recipes

No 1)

and therefore the best spent minutes in your foodie techie life would be:

Famous chef and activist Jamie Oliver from UK. He spends his 20 minutes well in describing why we are mistreating our children through bad nutrion.

Jamie’s presentation

Jamie Oliver · Chef, activist

Jamie Oliver is transforming the way we feed ourselves, and our children. The winner of the 2010 TED Prize, he’s on a mission to teach every family about eating better and living healthier lives.

A staggering 7,5 Million people have watched his talk so far and that is exkluding all other talks on the subject that he has done and that has been spread around the world. He is a true influencer for better and healthier food culture for everyone.

Jamie says that we should better teach our kids about food so that they themselves can take better decisions. Go Jamie.

https://www.ted.com/topics/food


Footnotes

  1. ^ Estimates of the number of bacteria — 5,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 — are higher than for all the stars, and Epstein noticed that when he stained his microbes with fluorescent dyes and placed them under a microscope they looked just like constellations in deep space