The Evolution


Throughout my second semester of junior year, I took a course that interested me.

It was Social Media Analytics with Tim Cigelske.

If you know Tim, you would know that he’s the man. You know the saying “The man, the myth, the legend”? Yeah, that’s Tim.

I originally wanted to take this course sophomore year, but it was already full.

Throughout this course I learned a lot. About social media, writing, analytics, story-telling and life. When the 3 hour time period was shown beneath the class during course sign-ups, I knew that one day a week would reap plenty of more benefits than our once-a-week meeting.

I found myself tinkering about what Tim taught us not just in class, but regularly. It started once a week during class, then I started thinking about what we learned every now and then. Before I knew it, it was every day.

As something comes to an end, the typical form of action is to reflect upon the prior time.

What did I learn throughout this course?

Although there are countless lessons Tim taught me throughout this course, I’ll narrow it down to two learnings.

  1. What I don’t want to do — social media as a career. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy social media for enjoyment and personal purposes. It’s a great way to stay up-to-date with friends. Yet, through a social media internship and two social media courses, I’ve realized, in my life, social media is something I enjoy for fun and not for work.
  2. What I do want to do — something digital media related. I enjoy social media, but I don’t want to do that as the only duty for my job. I think digital media is a great combination of where my passions and interests lie.
    Earlier this semester I re-visited my Summary section on LinkedIn. See below for the update and how this relates to what I want to do with my future.

This course was more than a class at a college university. This course was practically an internship in itself because it was real world application and first-hand experience. It was unlike any of the other classes I’ve taken at Marquette.

Thank you, Tim Cigelske, for a great semester!

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