“Prometheus: High Resolution Star Map Photo” from Daily Dead (https://dailydead.com). Licensed by Daily Dead, All rights reserved. Figure 1

Have you ever wondered how you can give those statistical data a bit more depth, give those graphs a whole new dimension or make scientific results more understandable? Fear not, WebGL is the tool for you!


What is trusted data?

We live in a plane in the space-time continuum surrounded by data. An inconceivable amount of data. Every day we observe, process, interpret, analyse and act upon data. Not just with computers, but with anything, everywhere. We watch TV, use social media, we look through the window, we smell the rain, we sense the tingling feeling on our feet when walking barefooted in the grass. We collect data 24/7, even when we sleep. With so much data out there, how can we trust it? What is “Trusted Data”?

“Milky Way Night Sky Black Rock Desert Nevada” by Steve JurvetsonFlickr. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Commons. Figure 1

If we take in consideration, the whole observable universe, scientists have calculated…


Hey, you. Yes, YOU! The developer reading this article. Are you ready to call the four horsemen and start the apocalypse? Start the next nuclear holocaust? Kill patients? Bankrupt banks? Do I have your attention yet? Yes? Good. Because all of this can happen, and will happen, if you do not keep your shit together.

A painting of the four horsemen of the apocalypse
A painting of the four horsemen of the apocalypse
“Apocalypse vasnetsov” by Viktor M. Vasnetsovhttp://lj.rossia.org/users/john_petrov/166993.html. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons. Figure 1

How do you ask? Well, how is your data? Can it be trusted? Do you think the users of your systems are safe without trusted data?

Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murphy%27s_law

Well, let me tell you what possibly could go wrong (or in reality, will go wrong):

You work as a system developer, developing a control system for the flow intake of gas from the pipelines in the North Sea. The system passes all tests and is shipped out to production with flying colours, and you celebrate. But then, disaster. A valve controlling gas intake in…


Or how to start the apocalypse

Hey, you. Yes, YOU! The developer reading this article. Are you ready to call the four horsemen and start the apocalypse? Start the next nuclear holocaust? Kill patients? Bankrupt banks? Do I have your attention yet? Yes? Good. Because all of this can happen, and will happen, if you do not keep your shit together.

“Apocalypse vasnetsov” by Viktor M. Vasnetsovhttp://lj.rossia.org/users/john_petrov/166993.html. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons. Figure 1

How do you ask? Well, how is your data? Can it be trusted? Do you think the users of your systems are safe without trusted data?

Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murphy%27s_law

Well, let me tell you what possibly could go wrong…


A theorem providing a basis for digital strategies for business

During a project at work, we were given a task on how a given industry could go digital via a disruptive or transformative path, and we quickly agreed upon a theorem provided by one of our team members, Kent Andersen. We liked it so much, that we coined it “Kent’s theorem”.

“CollatzFractal” by Pokipsy76 — English wikipedia. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Figure 1

“Kent’s theorem” is a theorem about how businesses have to transform to be prepared for the digital world:

Companies have to fix their problems in pace of innovation. Continues improvement demands basic agreement between IT and business. Embracement of new technology, R&D, user centered product development and minimizing of…


What can we do to make sure the data we have is trustworthy?

The previous article on “Trusted Data”, covered the definition on the term, but the article did not provide any leads yet on how to act on this. How do you work with data and ensure the data is trustworthy?

We will now cover those questions, and we begin with some key areas on how you can collect and process data. This could be used as a check list to make data more trustworthy.

“RAILROAD WORK CREW IMPROVES THE TRACKS AND BED OF THE ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE RAILROAD NEAR BELLEFONT, KANSAS… — NARA — 556012” by Charles O’Rear, 1941-, Photographer (NARA record: 3403717) — U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons. Figure 1

Sources

  • Have you used the given source before?
  • Has the source provided data that appeared to be correct in the past?
  • Have other parties used the source before?

Alexander V. Røyne-Helgesen

Technologist currently working as a Manager, Frontend Consultant at Bekk Consulting AS

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store