The biggest problem with your article is that its premise — that you supported Bernie Sanders and…
Evan Moulson
615

Oh dear… let’s see if we can help here:

  1. Considering that the job of elected officials is to represent their constituents, I’d say adapting your position to better suit your constituents’ needs is a pretty good quality. I much prefer Hillary’s “you might not be for me, but I am for you” to Bernie’s implication of “you’re either with me or you’re with the establishment.” So far, I agree with Bernie on everything… I’m worried about what happens when that changes. More to the point, I’m worried about what happens in a general election if Bernie continues these themes of alienation, and I’m worried about his ability to affect change in a government that was deliberately structured for slow centrist movement and compromise.
  2. Bernie Sanders has super PACs backing him, and more superPAC money has been spent on Bernie Sanders in this election than on Hillary Clinton. I guess people are just easily duped? http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2015/11/super_pac_money_how_political_groups_are_spending_to_influence_the_2016.html
  3. “Saying Bernie Sanders won every demographic is NH is like saying ‘I ate every vegetable in this cauliflower.’” But more to the point… NH results are basically irrelevant when the candidate hasn’t been dragged through the mud yet. Candidates have to be vetted. Bernie isn’t vetted. That’s the point.

I really wish people would click-through the links on posts and read writing from both sides instead of just spewing talking points (although it’s not like Bernie sets a great example for this). Sigh.

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