Personally, I believe that factual arguments are the strongest types of argument because it's backed with accurate evidence and data. With a couple taps on a keyboard, we could find any fact that could help prove any side of an argument. I agree with double-checking to see whether or not the "facts" you found are accurate because every person on the planet can post what they want on the internet. It's up to us to make sure that when we're researching, we thoroughly check our sources, to have strong evidence that will support the claims made in the argument. Great job with your post, it helped me understand factual arguments more clearly.

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Learning about the different types of definitions was very cool. I only ever consciously remember using formal definitions and definition by examples, but that's not to say I have never used the other two types. I found the operation definition to be the most intriguing because it's as if you form your version of an idea's definition and you determine what fits in the category of the idea. It makes it so that you can feel comfortable like the sexual harassment example you used. I also found the sustainable video to be very informative because learned that we need it for maintaining resources and that it something can only be sustainable if economical, environmental, and social factors all took place. Good job!

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I believe that our society sticks to its version of what is normal. We make these definitions by viewing ourselves and how we believe we should be. With these biased definitions, comes our disrespect towards people who are true to themselves. Especially growing up, we try to blend in with our friends so that we don't feel like the odd one out. But we fail to understand that the things that make us "weird", make us unique because not everyone is going to like the same things. We have to know that it's. okay to be different than the person next to you because that's your normal. Great job!

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Chapter one was a great foundation of what unit one would look like because we got a rundown of what the next couple of argument-filled weeks would look like. Whenever I think of arguments, I never think about how often we have them because we only focus on big and negative arguments. When in reality, arguments are a form of discourse that consists of at least two different opinions or viewpoints. We forget that a normal conversation between two friends could be considered an argument based on the context. If a group of friends is trying to figure out what they want for lunch, they're going to have a civil argument to make a final decision. Overall, I like that you talked more about one of the chapters because it felt like a nice refresher for the course.

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