These uncertain times have brought forth something interesting: the great ‘Work From Home’ experiment.

As most organizations are forced to operate remotely, I am eager to see what long-term changes come from this.

Many organizations that were resistant to WFH may learn that in fact it can be done. They will learn employees don’t need to be monitored in person to remain productive. Perhaps they won’t need the large offices spaces anymore. Will their policies change in the future?

Many employees are getting their first WFH experience. Some people who have never experienced it before may realize it’s not all…


So what’s the ROI of a strong company culture?

It’s a question I get asked often.

Well, let me share a story from this week.

For the last month I have been working with a client around a comprehensive culture strategy project. This has involved doing an analysis of their current culture with lots of one-on-one conversations with employees.

For the last 15 years this company has done an amazing job of making culture important. They focused on creating an amazing workplace and an environment that shows employees how much they care about them. …


It’s January 2nd. Your alarm goes off at 5am. You get dressed, grab a protein bar, a water, and head to the gym. You work out for an hour, grab a healthy smoothie afterwards and head to work. At lunch you have a salad, and for dinner you have a dinner of grilled chicken and broccoli. You feel great. You feel motivated. Today is the start of the new you. This is going to last.

Or so you thought. By mid-February you’re getting up at 7am, grabbing a latte and a bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich from Starbucks on your…


In January of 1914 Henry Ford announced to his board and the public at large of new changes he had decided on. Effective immediately, all assembly line employees would have their working day shortened from 9 hours to 8, and each person would see their daily pay rate double from $2.50 to $5.00. To say this was a shock would be an understatement. The board of directors thought he was crazy and actually tried to find a way to fire Ford, assuming this move would bankrupt the company. The competition thought it was great news, as they too assumed this…


When was the last time you admitted to someone you really care about or publicly that you were wrong about something? Personally, I can only think of a few times within the last few years. What I remember even clearer than the apology was the feeling of how hard it was to do. Admitting being wrong is difficult; we all strive to be ‘right’ in our beliefs and actions.

It is basic human nature to want to be right. We seek to validate our viewpoint or perspective as the right one, though often to the detriment of ourselves and those…


A man was sentenced to prison for 20 years.

When he got to prison, he was assigned a job. His job was to sit in a room and turn a crank 10 times every hour on the hour for 12 hours a day. The guards were very specific, that he must turn the crank exactly on the hour, and exactly 10 times.

‘What does the crank do?’ the man asked the guards, but they refused to answer. ‘Come on, you have to tell me what it does!’ he pleaded. …


When was the last time you went to a Blockbuster Video? My guess is that it’s been a while, and the reason may be because there aren’t many around anymore and you have Netflix. While hindsight is always 20/20 we often forget how big and dominate Blockbuster actually was in its heyday.

So how did Blockbuster go from a five billion dollar company to bankruptcy in less than 10 years? It’s because their product became obsolete. They didn’t adjust for the times. Their competition built a product for the future while they relied on ‘what they used to be’. …


Things were getting heated between two departments of a large construction equipment company. Each seemed to resent the other, and more than that, it was weighing on the overall morale across the entire company. Employees were frustrated, disengaged, and turnover was going through the roof.

The company’s leadership team knew there was a problem, but didn’t know what the cause was or how to fix it. Was it a manager issue? Was it a training issue? Was it a space issue? Was it a leadership issue? After a couple of months of feeling the effects across the company, the leadership…


I was in the middle of eating my chicken sandwich when our conversation turned to his employees. The gentleman I was having lunch with, a high level manager at a moderate-sized company began to give me his two cents about loyalty today.

He was frustrated. One of his employees just put in their two-week notice after 14 months in the job. It was his third employee in the last year to quit after less than two years with the company.

“No one has any loyalty anymore today. It’s not how it used to be. People were loyal to a company…


There is a title people love to give Millennials. The generation that grew up with participation trophies and non-numbered ribbons.

‘The Blue Ribbon Generation’

I’ve written about my issues with this label before. While I think there is merit in the effects, I feel the blame is wrongly placed on the Millennials. Whenever I hear someone throw out the ‘you all got trophies growing up’ argument, I am always quick to ask ‘who bought the blue ribbons?’ The answer is the parents. Not the kids.

This whole concept has always been interesting to me; not necessarily about who to blame…

Patrick Kelly

Speaker. Founder — Change Point Consulting. Re-imagining the future of work through culture and collaboration. www.changepointconsulting.com

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