Black and white: two types of designers

We are all used to humorous illustrations on the Internet about how the world is divided into two types of people … and then how far the imagination of the author extends. This distinction in the spirit of “boys to the left, the girls — to the right” is really funny, especially considering that in the majority of it so it is.

And so, amateurs to divide the world in half, before you — Nick Bell — designer, former creative director of Eye magazine, a former professor of Communication Design, who developed graphic designers in two corners and wrote about this in his essay, where he described two Type, which are two polar opposites.

No intermediate types or shades of gray — only black and white. So, Bell considered the infamous interference of the brand in culture, where museums and art centers present themselves from the same position as corporations and other joint-stock organizations. But it’s not about that. There are two types of designers:

Neutrality agents

Graphic designers who do not see the point in expressing their own self in design. For them, they themselves are passive messengers of the client’s messages, responsible for the clarity and accuracy of the message. Unfortunately, the reverse side of the coin here is passivity, which becomes equal to turning off your own look and style. In short, clarity is clear, and the picture is faceless.

What we have next — work perfectly with the grid, the identity, and reference books. They love order and follow the rules. They are lost without any restrictions, which sometimes (sometimes unfairly) comes to them sideways at work.

Usually neutral in terms of any political or social issues, which makes them attractive to a wide variety of customers, adhere to the “business and nothing personal” scheme with them. It is prone to review content as something delivered by others, and therefore it is not the subject matter.

Aesthetes of style

These are designers who are interested in design directly — their work is done for the sake of and in the name of design, and each of their projects is a new opportunity for them to pamper their eyes (their own first). Often criticized by customers as underestimating their opinion, and even not taking it into account at all.

Put the visual component at the center of everything. Have a look that is often unsuitable outside of their profession. They complain about the lack of understanding of their vision of the world and their underestimation by others. Some hate the grid system and instructions for building a style, but there are those who have mastered these principles and successfully cultivated their style on their soil. They are delighted with pastel, neon shades, local lacquering, and foil stamping. Among environmentalists and the use of recycled materials are not listed. Like the first, they are usually neutral in terms of political and social issues. It is prone to review content as something delivered by others, and ask only one question: “how can I make a candy out of this?”

The practice of corporate style design — and here he adds that graphic design in general should be inextricably intertwined with the content for which it serves — make content the point of departure, not the design.

Here’s how in two steps Bell described the feelings of many designers. You can be passive, be the voice of your customers, creative characters, stuttering ideas, devoted only to your imagination. These two types of designers are usually perceived as two completely different categories — two antagonists: Esthetes usually despise Agents for their pragmatic and obsequiousness to business; The latter, in turn, accuse the Esthetes of their “immature” desire to please their aesthetic nature.

The designer can take it to a note, you can analyze, you can choose your own path, but the main idea of this classification is not in the choice between the two. Bell singled out not only the difference, but also similarities, such as the absence of an ardent affiliation with any political or social groups, and, of course, the lack of interest in the content of the work that designers perform.

I must say that designers (like everyone else, however) resist double classifications, but nevertheless, the description of Bella contains little more than a little truth. And the advice here is so universal that it has already become a cliche, as the author emphasizes, but he consists in creating a design from within, and only then move outward.

“The practice of corporate style design — and here he adds that graphic design in general must be inextricably intertwined with the content for which it serves — make content the point of departure, not the design.” Call it content, substance, meaning — this is often an item that is not given much importance. So, in this ambiguous world described by Nick Bell, make it the third choice. Select the content.

P. S. still pictures of two types of people, (we know you like it).

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