Playkey DevLog. Issue Twenty Five. Roadmap update.

In the last issue, we promised to review the most recent quarter. And even if we didn’t promise, we’re going to do it anyway. July, August, and September turned out to be busier than any of us had anticipated. We even completed tasks that we hadn’t planned on solving. Everything is now up-to-date and you’ll find all the details below.

The details

If you opened the previous devlogs for more than just the videos and jokes, you’ll remember that in the third quarter we were mainly working on Desktop and transferring games to this technology. The desktop is a key component to the decentralized version of Playkey. We simply couldn’t move ahead without it. Now it’s ready and the centralized version has already been moved to it! We completed work on two tasks for this previously undeservedly unappreciated milestone in the third quarter:

  • Implementation of Desktop technology needed for decentralized architecture;
  • Transfer of centralized version of the platform to Desktop.

At the same time, “Developing a smart contract for interactions between users of the Playkey ecosystem” and “Launch of the platform in South Korea” have been pushed out all the way to 2019. Careful readers might ask what on earth we’ll be doing in the fourth quarter. But we actually have two important decentralization tasks planned for that period:

  • Development of technology to stabilize streaming between miners and gamers;
  • Development of quality control system for gaming sessions to enable payments between miners and gamers.
It’d be hard to imagine our developer logs without all the cool games in our roster. For example, consider Warframe.

Streaming stabilization technology provides quality gaming on a decentralized system. Right now Playkey servers are uniform, but once the miners show up, the fleet of all possible hardware will grow filthy big. And it’s the job of the stabilization technology to unite this massive army and provide pleasant and convenient gameplay to all gamers.

Producing a gaming session quality control system is the second objective of the fourth quarter. This system is necessary to rate session quality on a miner’s computer. When rating, we’ll evaluate channel bandwidth, network losses, FPS, hard drive read speed, jitter (you, of course, know that this term means phase variation in digital data flow), video card and processor characteristics, as well as another dozen or so parameters. Soon we’ll dedicate an entire log to rating. Or maybe two logs.

We barely managed to stuff all this into the fourth quarter, which pushed “Alpha-version improvements” and “Launch of the platform in the USA” to 2019.

A brief summary for lazy people

Therefore, additions to the 2018 work plan are:

  • Implementation of Desktop technology needed for decentralized architecture (Third quarter, done);
  • Transfer of centralized version of the platform to Desktop (Third quarter, done);
  • Development of technology to stabilize streaming between miners and gamers (Fourth quarter, in progress);
  • Development of quality control system for gaming sessions to enable payments between miners and gamers (Fourth quarter, in progress).

As a result, the following tasks have been added to the 2019 plan:

  • Developing a smart-contract for interactions between users of the Playkey ecosystem;
  • Launch of the platform in South Korea;
  • Alpha-version improvements;
  • Launch of the platform in the USA.

Reasons for this:

  • Making a smart contract without a detailed plan for quality control is useless. It’s unclear what code should be written there, and quality control is scheduled for the fourth quarter;
  • Launching the centralized platform in the USA and South Korea and getting distracted by finding appropriate data centers and building servers there is not efficient at all; all our efforts are now directed towards implementing the decentralized platform as soon as possible. The platform will eliminate all the logistical issues while we temporarily “test-drive” the centralized version in Europe since we can use the existing server clusters instead of building new ones there.

And that’s it for now. Brevity is the soul of wit. See you in the next issue!