Upgrade Your Press Releases for the Mobile Age.

Write for the screen, not the page.

Most people are still writing press releases for an 8.5" x 11" sheet, even though the days of sending page-long faxes are over. Think about the platforms your release will be viewed on. It’s likely to be opened on a phone screen — much smaller than a sheet of paper.

How many scrolls does it take to get to the bottom of your press release?

TIP 1: KEEP IT SHORT.

In the old days, the optimal press release was a one-page sheet that was faxed to newsrooms. Now that reporters on-the-go read releases on mobile phones, you should make the messaging choices it takes to shorten yours. If your release is ten scrolls long, don’t expect it to be read.

Reporters can get hundreds of press releases a day. If you’re lucky, they’ll open yours. But don’t expect them to read more than the first few lines.

TIP 2: MAKE IT READABLE

On a phone, each line of text fits five to ten words. One paragraph on a standard page can fill an entire screen. Be sure your release is readable for mobile by breaking up paragraphs. If you’re including links, put them on their own line to make them easy to click.

Only half of all opened emails are viewed on a computer. The rest are read on mobile devices like phone and tablets.

TIP 3. TEST YOUR MOBILE RELEASE

You’re probably already testing emailed press releases on the computer before you send them out. You should also test releases on your phone and tablet. Make sure the formatting and readability of your release scales for mobile.

Mobile devices now account for nearly 2 of every 3 minutes spent online.

TIP 4. CONTENT OVER IMAGES

Tradition demands a company’s logo and address be placed at the top of a press release. That’s not strategic for mobile. Images in your release, when viewed on a phone, often expand to fill the screen. It’s best to put all images, even logos, at the bottom of your releases now that reporters are viewing them on phones.

8 out of 10 consumers stop engaging with a piece of content if it doesn’t display well on the device they are using.

TIP 5. USE RESPONSIVE DESIGN

Responsive design is when a web page or email can scale down to the size of a small screen without damage to content or formatting. Mailchimp, which has free and paid packages, offers templates with responsive design and a preview of how your press release will look on a phone.

TAKEAWAYS: PRESS RELEASES FOR THE MOBILE AGE via rachaelpr.com

See more of my PR infographics and blog posts at: rachaelpr.com.