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I appreciate your view, but I whole-heartedly disagree with it.

Sure, from an evolutionary perspective, it makes sense that men take more risks than women, but you seem to imply that taking risks merits success and praise and ignore the fact that our culture favors masculine qualities over feminine qualities, which is the definition of bias.

Hysteria?

The “Women in Tech” movement does not aim to make women behave like men, but encourage women to participate on an equal playing field.

We simply cannot sit idly while people like this put down women just for being women.


Past versus Present

You mention great historical figures, such as Joan of Arc, who lived during a time allegedly more difficult for women. I would argue the opposite.

Historically, we were much more open to women making significant impact than we are today.

We’ve seen women lead empires, going as far back in history as ancient Egypt, such as Nefertiti, Hatshepsut, and cleopatra, among lesser known female pharaohs, such as nicrotis, twosret, mereneith, ahhotep, khentkaus, and sobekneferu.

And in science, again we have Meritptah going as far back as ancient Egypt. We have agamede, agnodike, aglaonike, Theano, and Hypatia from Ancient Greece. We have Caroline Herschel, Margaret Cavendish, and Laura Bassi in the 17th century. Let’s not forget about pioneers in nuclear science, such as Madame curie and Lisa Meitner. We’ve seen women led scientific revolutions.

There many more women who led in the fields of Math, Medicine, Astronomy, Botany, Biology, more than I can list here.


Nose-Diving

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/women-in-tech_n_6955940.html

Today, in Technology specifically, we are nose-diving when it comes to women.

https://www.ncwit.org/resources/women-it-facts

It’s even worse when we consider the fact that girls in school are losing interest because they think technology and computers are a “guy” thing.

https://community.asme.org/decision_point_dialogues/b/weblog/default.aspx

So, I implore you to be part of the solution and propose new ways of moving forward, rather than complaining about people who are trying to make a difference.

Lastly, I want to leave you with this gem: women are better software developers than men!

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