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Photo by Daniel McCullough on Unsplash

When you hear people in marketing describe what they do, they tend to talk in terms of the different functional areas that typically make up a marketing organization — I am a product marketer; I do marcom; I work on demand gen; etc. Yet, when you think of many of the goals that marketing has, it doesn’t really fit nicely into any particular area.

For example, many of the projects I do for early-stage startups involves developing a narrative and then getting that story out through various channels. This requires skills and expertise that cut across different areas — messaging development, product marketing, content development, public relations, etc. But there hasn’t been a term that nicely captures this multifaceted discipline. …


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Photo by Daniele Levis Pelusi on Unsplash

Last week, I went to an event organized by ETW Advisors, a startup advisory firm, where a public relations (PR) professional gave advice to startup founders on developing and executing a communications plan. The presenter did a great job at addressing all of the main things founders should keep in mind as they think about developing a PR function within their company. And many of those in the audience were watching with rapt attention, as they jotted down notes, took photos of slides, and asked questions during the Q&A session.

As I sat there, not knowing anything about the companies being represented at the event, I wondered, “do all of these early-stage startups really need to be thinking about PR right now?” My answer used to be a resounding yes, but based on my recent experiences, primarily in the B2B startup world, my answer is now more of a maybe. …


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Photo by Suzanne D. Williams on Unsplash

Years ago, Aaron Levie, the CEO and a co-founder of Box, wrote a post on TechCrunch entitled, “Rise Of The Enterprise ‘Toys’.” In his post, Levie talks about enterprise solutions that are initially viewed as “toys” and then they develop into “solutions”. As he puts it…

Students of the Innovator’s Dilemma know that a new technology starts out being just “good enough.” Often, an early solution only serves a niche part of the market with limited requirements. …

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