The First 30 Days at Charikot Hospital

in Photos.
Our team recently started running a major hospital hub in a district devastated by the Nepal earthquakes. We have a historic 10-year contract with the Government of Nepal to prove we can deliver high-quality, low-cost healthcare in rural and remote areas.
See what we’ve accomplished in the first 30 days.
Manju Jirel, 24, smiles with her newborn son, delivered by C-section.
Dambar Prasad Oli sits with his computer at the registration desk, ready to upload the next patient into Possible’s Electronic Health Record system.
Lab technician Parbati Thapa is trained on the EHR system by our Healthcare Systems Engineer Anant Raut.
Our health worker, Surendra Khanal, applies a nebulizer to a patient with lung problems.
Singha Bahadur Sarki, 97, was living with unbearable pain because of his hernia, and despite the risks, insisted on receiving surgery.
Not only was the surgery a success, but he also made it to national news.
A man looks at his wife in the Emergency Room as she receives an IV. She came in with raging stomach pain, and had vomited throughout the two hour drive to the hospital.
She was discharged five hours later, pain free and with medication to take home.
50-year-old Gambhir Kumari Shrestha badly cut her foot on the base of a Doko, a traditional vessel made out of crisscrossing bamboo shafts and used to carry leaves and firewood.

She was bleeding profusely and carried by her neighbors on a two-hour walk down to the main road, from where they caught a bus to the hospital. After her husband’s suicide, she lives with her brother-in-law’s family. On April 25, her home was destroyed in the earthquake. She survived, and now lives in a temporary shack.

Her sister-in-law, who had traveled with her, says her family couldn’t afford to take her to a private hospital in the city for the skin graft she needed.

Above, Gambhiri is seen eating beans out of a plastic bag, as she waits for her surgery at our hospital.

It is the immediate and essential help we are able to provide in cases like these, that makes our mission to provide free healthcare intensely gratifying. Our second site, added after eight years in Nepal, will carry this forward as we continue to scale our work.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.