You Need Clarity and Continuity of Promise When Rebranding

We came across this rebrand announcement ad in the Daily Nation of Kenya, 5 April 2016.

The rebrand confronts the audience with a new name and new logo.

We like the new colourway, though the dark greys kind of denote a move from informal to formal banking. (It is not clear if this is the rebrands intention)

The typeface though, is overused and in this sector and market is indistinguishable from the one used by Ecobank undermining the uniqueness obligation of an identity.

Overall the look is a fresh update, but this piece is about message.

The message layout of the announcement adopts a scorched earth approach.

The existing brand represents a promise, a message contract and the transition of the rebrands needs to transfer or elevate this message.

This is the reason that most rebrands assume an evolutionary strategy, so as to minimise losses in current brand equity also read as intellectual property value in the transition.

The name change deserves the creation of a heritage story of its own.

Most rebrands value heritage and seek to create a clear line of continuity in both the image and story of the identity.

Most rebrands are an evolution

Too much is new in the K-Rep > Sidian rebrand announcement. The format of the ad should at least pay respects to the previous identity (not use it in a form not used before) and have a layout that demonstrates the continuity of contract.

A “storified” layout making a connection with the old logo.

Whether a rebrand is about repositioning, renaming or just refreshing, care should be taken in crafting a narrative that acts as the conduit to the possibilities of the new brand.

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We can be reached at human[at]utu.co.ke for brand innovation design.