Distributed Services with Go — by Travis Jeffery (84 / 84)

👈 What You Learned | TOC

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Explore Software Defined Radio

Do you want to be able to receive satellite images using nothing but your computer, an old TV antenna, and a $20 USB stick? Now you can. At last, the technology exists to turn your computer into a super radio receiver, capable of tuning in to FM, shortwave, amateur “ham,” and even satellite frequencies, around the world and above it. Listen to police, fire, and aircraft signals, both in the clear and encoded. …


Distributed Services with Go — by Travis Jeffery (32 / 84)

👈 Goals When Building a Service | TOC | Compile with the gRPC Plugin 👉

A gRPC service is essentially a group of related RPC endpoints — exactly how they’re related is up to you. A common example is a RESTful grouping where the relation is that the endpoints operate on the same resource, but the grouping could be looser than that. In general, it’s just a group of endpoints needed to solve some problem. In our case, the goal is to enable people to write to and read from their log.

Creating a gRPC service involves defining it in…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (127 / 127)

👈 Your API Project Assets Checklist | TOC

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Quantum Computing

You’ve heard that quantum computing is going to change the world. Now you can check it out for yourself. Learn how quantum computing works, and write programs that run on the IBM Q quantum computer, one of the world’s first functioning quantum computers. Develop your intuition to apply quantum concepts for challenging computational tasks. Write programs to trigger quantum effects and speed up finding the right solution for your problem. Get your hands on the future of computing today.

Nihal Mehta, Ph.D.

(580 pages) ISBN: 9781680507201…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (126 / 127)

👈 Notes on the Assets Checklist | TOC | You May Be Interested In… 👉

The following is the general assets list I use to start an API project.

  1. API story document: MUST
  • See Writing the API Story
  • Recommend using an approved template/pattern for stories
  • As a — — I want to — — so that — –
  • Purpose, Data, Actions, Rules, Processes
  • Recommend collecting supporting documents (forms, write-ups, wireframes, and so on)
  • If available, include output from event-storming or other sessions
  1. API diagram: MUST


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (125 / 127)

👈 Using the API Project Assets Checklist | TOC | Your API Project Assets Checklist 👉

As a rule, each asset should be something you can create in less than a day. If your API is extensive (dozens of actions), you can break the API into smaller subsections and produce assets for each subset. For example, the API Definition document and API Test collection may take several days to complete, but it should not take more than a workweek. If that seems unlikely, break the definition and tests into smaller collections and complete those as needed.

You’ll notice that each…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (124 / 127)

👈 Appendix 3 API Project Assets Checklist | TOC | Notes on the Assets Checklist 👉

If you are a stand-alone “full stack” developer working on the project, I suggest you work through this assets checklist in the order presented. As you gain experience with the list, you might change up the order in a way that works better for you. For example, you may write your tests earlier and create smaller prototypes that you can test before completing all your design elements.

If you’re working on a team that divides responsibilities between roles — for example, designers, developers, and…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (123 / 127)

👈 11: ng APIs | TOC | Using the API Project Assets Checklist 👉

One of the important takeaways from this book is that every API project should have a consistent set of elements — what I call project assets. This appendix provides a condensed list of those important API project assets that you can use to help ensure that you’ve covered the important aspects of your API project (“Do you have a coherent API story document?”) and that you’ve covered all the key tasks for a successful API (“Did you write, and run, your API tests?”). …


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (122 / 127)

👈 10: APIs | TOC | Appendix 3 API Project Assets Checklist 👉

Most of the work of deploying our API project into production is handled by the Heroku CLI Client we reviewed in the chapter. However, we need to manually deploy the application (in other words, type in the proper command in the command window) in order to complete the deployment process. That means our current level of automation is at continuous delivery. (See Continuous Delivery, for details.)

This exercise challenge is for you to elevate your deployment automation to continuous deployment — to automate that last step of…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (121 / 127)

👈 9: Is | TOC | 11: ng APIs 👉

The exercise for this chapter (Chapter 10, Securing APIs) focuses on using Auth0 to define your API security, collect the access control parameters, modify your API source code, and then test the results.

Define Your API in Auth0

The exercise instructions included the name of the new API security definition (bigco-credit-check). To create this definition, you need to log in to the http://auth0/com website and navigate to the dashboard page. There you can select the APIs option in the left navigation pane and, when the list of APIs appears, click the Create API button that…


Design and Build Great Web APIs — by Mike Amundsen (120 / 127)

👈 8: APIs | TOC | 10: APIs 👉

In the exercise for this chapter (Chapter 9, Testing APIs), your task is to create a Postman test collection for your credit-check API project and write two tests: a “happy path” test for the Home resource (http://localhost:8181/) and a “sad path” test for the From resource (http://localhost:8181/form/). You were supplied with extensive instructions for each test.

For extra credit, you were given the task to export the completed tests and use the newman command-line utility to run the tests locally.

Note: Before you start this exercise, make sure your local version…

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