Wabi sabi is a beautiful Japanese concept that has no direct translation in English. Both an aesthetic and a worldview, it connotes a way of living that finds beauty in imperfection and accepts the natural cycle of growth and decay.


From the earliest times, people have striven to turn their houses into homes through the use of decoration and furnishings, stimulating, in turn, a major commercial sector dedicated to offering the products and services essential to feed the ever-changing dictates of domestic fashion. Whilst there is plentiful evidence to show that these phenomena can be traced to medieval times, it is arguable that the eighteenth century witnessed the birth of a widespread and sophisticated consumer society.


For most people who live and work here, have seen the city from a tourist’s perspective. The high rise buildings and glamorous lifestyle never failed to lead the same narrative. But this ever-expanding city looks very different from the bylanes and countrysides. At most times strange and sometimes frightening. And only some has ventured, to find out how it looks from the outer edge. This is a series of photographs which explores the city from unknown terms. It is a collection of both abstract and soul-satisfying images which sometimes feed into the dark humor that the city can acquire over…


With such changing times and explosive climate, its hard to keep up with your creative rut and positive mindset. As a filmmaker, I know how difficult it becomes to live when your life becomes monotonous, when your job starts sucking, when you can’t find work, when your relationship turns out to be necessity and when the whole world starts making a meme out of you. But don’t worry, your not alone, it happens with everyone in some part of their life.

In times of difficulties, you need not to keep your head down but rise and shine. …


Photographs of women shot across the length of India from Kanyakumari to Kashmir..

This year I embarked on a journey with Srishti Bakshi and her team Crossbow Miles who were on a mission to spread women empowerment and discover the problems that women are still facing in India. My job was to document the whole journey of her and the women we met and came across on our paths. I also edited branded and non-branded content for all the sponsors and people who were associated with the walk.

Equipped with bare minimum cameras and laptops I travelled to every nook…


Everyday essentially I wrote a poem for 20 minutes. The time, that I spent traveling in Mumbai local. The writings are not related to me or anyone I know but just the everyday things or happenings that I see and feel in this ever changing world. Poems are raw and not curated to give you a feel of the writers surrounding as well. Feel free to drop in comments and share. Much love.. ❤


Everyday essentially I wrote a poem for 20 minutes. The time, that I spent traveling in Mumbai local. The writings are not related to me or anyone I know but just the everyday things or happenings that I see and feel in this ever changing world. Poems are raw and not curated to give you a feel of the writers surrounding as well. Feel free to drop in comments and share. Much love.. ❤


The Story of a Homemaker Mother

For anyone who is leaving home and staying in other states for work or education, knows the importance of a homemaker in their lives. It is not surprising, how quickly they can rise in your important peoples chart. That one day, you will be seeing their importance as much as your mom.


Last year I read a book that blew my mind. I was travelling in the Himalayas on a shoot I was passionate about. I read the book as I traveled and I felt that I was in the story. The book is fiction, but ‘Mr. Iyer goes to war’ is a powerful story that can transport people who read it. It certainly transported me. The only difference between Mr. Iyer and I is that he was not one to ‘lose himself in the forking paths of his own worried imagination.’

Ryan Lobo, the author has written a story that deals…


Ships waiting for dismantling near the

When the death appeared so surreal..

Walking down the Gunpowder Road, one enters the heart of Darukhana, a bustling maze of shops, shacks and godowns. Darukhana is an area of Mazgaon, Byculla (Mumbai). Packed with dingy tin godowns, narrow lanes and factories, the area conceals a remarkable history. Several artists also frequent this place, to find knick-knacks like nuts and bolts, for their sculptures and murals. Nowhere else in Bombay is there so much space to work.

Prakhar Deep Jain

A Filmmaker

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store