Chemotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis

A Guide For Those Who Might Be Fearful

Philip Siddons

--

I’m a worrier. Maybe even a touch neurotic. When I check-in for most physician office exams, they check my blood pressure. When they pump up the BP cuff and it tightens around my arm, I’d worry that they might keep tightening it so that it could squeeze my arm, severing it from my body. You’d think after seventy years and hundreds (perhaps thousands) of BP checks, this distorted fantasy would disappear. The good news is that I no longer think the intake nurse is going to remove my arm.

With the blood pressure measuring, they pressure and lightly clamp a cute little alligator-like gadget on the end of my finger to measure the oxygen saturation. But the accompanying monitoring of my oxygen saturation still causes me momentary concern. The little “pulse-ox” device gently clamped on my fingertip looks benign. In a few seconds, it measures the flow of blood in my finger. In reality, like blood pressure readings, it is a painless measurement of important information about my circulation.

I’ve probably read too many Steven King novels but I worry that some evil and sinister felon designed a pulse-ox device might eat off the end of my finger physically.

“I’m so sorry!” the nurse would say. What would I do then, as my severed finger continues to be “eaten” by the now-animated plastic device?

My arm and my fingers are still attached after all these years. That doesn’t necessarily mean that I should have no worries. I’m a worrier and my imagination, as you can see, can get the best of me.

I’ve never felt comfortable with getting shots from the doctor or nurse. When I was prescribed chemotherapy for my multiple sclerosis, I worried. And no, they haven’t yet locked me away in an institution. Maybe something is wrong with the system. Perhaps they’re understaffed and haven’t been able to get to me?

When you hear the word “chemotherapy,” you might first think of cancer patients having lost their hair and being nauseated from their treatments. Fortunately, there are no side effects like that with the therapy for Multiple Sclerosis patients. In fact, the treatment turns out to be considerably easier than I first imagined. This article describes my experience so that others, particularly the worriers, can relax about the procedure.

--

--

Philip Siddons

Working to create egalitarian communities which seek gender, racial & economic justice. medium.com/@psiddons | FlyByNight.us | http://connectedness.org