A change is coming to the internet as we know it today. In fact, the shift may already be underway with the advent of cryptoassets. In Web 1.0 consumers accessed the web through dial-up modems and read information on static websites. Users, both consumer and enterprise alike, had to settle for read-only websites and subpar shopping cart experiences. While laughable today, it was the dawn of the information age. We have seen what information access can do to societies. The Gutenberg printing press produced books en masse and disseminated information at the speed physical distribution. With Web 1.0, information exchanged between two parties at the speed of 56 kbit/s, the bandwidth enabled by consumer grade modems at the time. An average 2 gigabyte film would take a little over 85 days to download back then. We’ve come a long way since. The internet today, broadly referred to as Web 2.0, allows users to interact with web services such as Facebook or Google from a range of devices including mobile phones, laptops, tablets, and home IoT devices. But even at the beginning of Web 2.0, …


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Shout out to my new team member CryptoRaider for his technical due diligence and editorial support on this article. If you are a researcher or writer and would like to join the team please reach out to me at contact@quantalys.us

MultiVAC is a new entrant in the public blockchain space. Using sharding (similar to Zilliqa, Quarkchain, and Emotiq) MultiVAC aims to produce high TPS to enable decentralized applications (dApps). Differentiating itself from Zilliqa and Emotiq (built off of OmniLedger), MultiVAC adopts Verifiable Random Functions (VRF) for its consensus mechanism and shard selection. Projects such as Dfinity and Ontology introduce similar randomized methods to elect block creators. MultiVAC’s accounting method uses UXO, similar to Bitcoin. Developers will have the ability to flex between the tradeoffs within the CAP Theorem, namely consistency, availability, and partition tolerance. If you’re unfamiliar with CAP please see the Education Series article titled Blockchain: A Game of Tradeoffs. In short, decentralized computing at scale is currently an unsolved problem in computer science. Decentralized networks can maximize along two corners of the triangle with consistency, availability, and partition representing the edges. …


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Full disclosure: I am in active discussions to advise Blockcloud because I think reimagining the current stack of the internet and connected devices may one day be a necessity with the projected growth of connected devices. Plus I really enjoyed my conversations with the entire team. Beyond the technology, working with great people is paramount.

Shout out to my new team member CryptoRaider for his technical due diligence and editorial support on this article. Shout out to Windra over at Coin Crunch for his read over my initial draft. …


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Aergo plans to develop not only a blockchain, but also a fully featured ecosystem to enable businesses and developers from any industry onchain. Knowing full well that IT departments are not yet up to speed on building decentralized applications, Aergo’s ecosystem will feature a variety of technologies that look and feel familiar. Separating itself from many of the blockchains today, Aergo does not tout high throughput (measured by Transactions Per Second, TPS) as its defining feature. There are several optimizations laid out in its documentation enabling potentially higher throughput so I will call those out where appropriate throughout this review. Bringing businesses to the decentralized internet is Aergo’s primary focus. Businesses are concerned about application uptime, low latency, data security, and privacy. …


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Origo aims to create a smart contract enabled blockchain platform with strong privacy features. Similar to Loki Network, Edenchain, and upcoming project Aergo, Origo Network aims to feature privacy as one of the main drivers of adopting decentralized applications (dApps). Nowhere is the need for privacy more paramount than in the collection of identity and behavior data. In the June 2nd, 2018 edition of The Economist titled The Surveillance State: Perfected in China, a Threat in the West, the front cover story discusses why privacy deterrent technologies are necessary. Scandals including Facebook’s recent Cambridge Analytica debacle nosedived the behemoth’s reputation and market cap. Investors, businesses, and users alike would be well informed to balance the need for privacy and profits. …


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Disclaimer: I was not paid for this review nor have I invested in this project. On my ICO rankings sheet Choon ranks in the “I would consider” category (all projects highighted in yellow). Also, my sheet is a bit more unconventional since no project will score above a 70%. That’s just how my sheet is configured.

It has been awhile since I published a dApp review and thought it might be time to publish a new one. The last one I covered was Mithril, a social media platform similar to Snapchat. A new project called Choon came across my desk and what caught my eye immediately was it was founded by Gareth Emery, an electronic music producer I listen to. …


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This review is for a project that appears promising in my mind. It’s a bit early to review it due to the fact the team is still sorting out how it’s going to reach a more public audience. For now it’s in private sale with no plans for a public Token Generation Event (TGE). Their website is also outdated so I stitch a bunch of information I was able to gather for this review. I will obviously need to issue an update as I receive final details from the team.

Emotiq calls itself a next-generation blockchain with powerful scalability and privacy, combining the latest research in distributed ledger technology with an innovative natural-language approach to smart contracts. Rather than targeting the programmers who already know smart contract languages such as Solidity (based on JavaScript), Emotiq focuses on bringing in the larger audience of people who program out of necessity. That’s a lot to take in there so I’ll break down each of the buzzwords as it will be relevant to where it fits amongst the other blockchain projects out there. …


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Gaming is a twelve figure industry. From console based to mobile games, players are increasing their average spend on digital in-game items. When I worked for Google I recall the impressive revenues to the Google Play P&L due to game hungry countries such as Korea and Japan. Blockchain is a great technology to enable gaming asset ownership. If there are two things that blockchain does very well it is: 1) data ownership and 2) cross network payments. Bit.game aims to do more than just track asset ownership and transfers.

There are other established gaming projects such as Enjin and up-and-coming projects such as Rupie.io. What stands out to me about Bit.game is depth of the team and the well rounded group of advisors from prominent projects such as Elastos and Matrix AI. Aside from the team, the use case of data ownership and ability to move beyond restricted gardens is not just an attractive investment thesis, but also an incredible utility vehicle for gamers. Let’s say you play World of Warcraft (WoW) for several years and your characters have built up substantial in-game wealth. Switching away from WoW would mean having to leave your accumulated assets on that game. With blockchain exchanges, digital assets can be flipped for other gaming assets or other digital assets altogether. …


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Ankr Network aims to build a permissionless, resource efficient, scalable blockchain that also features native capabilities to interact with existing data solutions. Its consensus mechanism is called Proof of Useful Work suggests the computational resources powering the blockchain will be far more efficient than existing Proof-of-Work schemas today. Sidechains and sharding will be featured in Ankr’s solution to achieve scalability. To bring in outside data to the Ankr Network, a native oracle service will be prominently featured. Like other blockchains, Ankr’s smart contract capabilities will be its key to powering decentralized applications (hereon referred to as dApps).

Unfortunately the whitepaper is not open to the public nor are the token metrics. That leaves me with very little to review sadly. I have reached out to the team via LinkedIn to connect. Hopefully I can learn a little more and share what I am allowed to with my readers. …


COTI (Currency Of The Internet) aims to develop a decentralized form of money via its decentralized protocol. Instead of using a blockchain as its primary data structure, COTI is designing a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) based ledger. Other projects using a DAG are Fantom, ByteBall, and IOTA. Where blockchains are slow and expensive, COTI promises to deliver a fast and inexpensive method of transactions. This article will dive into DAGs briefly in the context of how it compares to blockchain but I will later release a deep dive into them as an Education Series article. …

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Quantalysus

Thoughts on cryptocurrency and blockchain technology

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