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Illustration by Gaëlle Malenfant

Like many companies during these COVID times, Doctolib went full remote almost overnight. But, through this pandemic, we have been fortunate enough to pursue our growth.. We welcome up to 15 new developers every month to help us transform healthcare, and we need to make sure they feel part of the team from the get go. We have a very strong events culture at Doctolib, and we used to have a lot of occasions to meet on campus for onboarding and in other places for team building activities. …


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Illustration by Gaëlle Malenfant

In this article, you’ll learn more about how we used Discord to organise a successful online meetup.

For the last six months, and because of the current situation, we’ve had to give up on inviting people into our office for meetups. As much as this breaks our hearts, we can’t take any chances, especially as a HealthTech company! Does it mean we have to stop organising meetups? Of course not : A lot of them have gone online using tools such as Zoom. Which of course, works very well…as long as your meetup doesn’t require too many interactions between participants.

One of the meetups Doctolib organises is called Contribute. The pitch is easy: first, anyone can present an open source project and some good “first time issues”, then we let people assemble interest groups so they can work on issues and create pull requests. …


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Illustration by Garance Bigo

At Doctolib, we’ve been building native software for a few years now, which we install directly on doctor’s computers to improve their Doctolib experience.

Of course, we do write unit and integration tests to make sure that the software does what it is supposed to. But sometimes, it’s not enough.

Once, we made a major change to a feature and for the new code to work properly, the updater needed to write a new line in the software’s config file. Of course we manually tested that a fresh install would write this line. “That should be enough right?”, …


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Illustration by Gaëlle Malenfant

A few months back, our team decided to migrate one of our projects to TypeScript. The full rationale may be the subject of a future blog post, but suffice to say we’re working in an area with bindings to native code and proprietary (often undocumented) interfaces where the strong-typing we get from TS is already helping, catching runtime errors before they occur in time-pressured situations.

Here we’ll assume that, like us, you want to perform a full migration, without impacting the delivery of new features.

Disclaimer: This is not a guide on how to change JavaScript code to TypeScript. It’s a more of a generic guide about how to organise and manage such a migration. …


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tldr: we made this: jest-os-detection

The context

At Doctolib, we write a some native code in order to make our web application interact with native software our users are using. We support both MacOS and Windows for this product. This native code, written in Node.js (packaged with PKG) and C++, follows the same hard rule as the rest of our codebase: untested code is unfinished code!

In order to have these tests executed on all the OS we support, we use Azure Devops. It allows us to run the same tests on both Windows and Mac machines. …

About

Quentin Menoret

Engineering Manager @Doctolib

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