This is the fifth of a series of articles about the economics of LARP (live action role-playing) and the failure of market forces within the hobby. This series is derived from a lecture which I gave at Camelot UK LARP conference held in November 2019.

  • The first blog of this series, about LARP and the Failure of Market Forces, can be found here.
  • The second in the series, about What LARP Should Cost, can be found here.
  • The third in this blog series, discussing What do Other Similar Pastimes Charge? can be found here.
  • The fourth entitled What are we charging? can be found here.

A late night plot meeting at All for One

This is the fourth of a series of articles about the economics of LARP (live action role-playing) and the failure of market forces within the hobby. This series is derived from a keynote lecture which I gave at Camelot UK LARP conference held in November 2019.

  • The first blog of this series, about LARP and the Failure of Market Forces, can be found here.
  • The second in the series, about What LARP Should Cost, can be found here.
  • The third in this blog series, discussing What do Other Similar Pastimes Charge? can be found here.

Other interactive experiences and how they compare to LARP

This is the third of a series of articles about the economics of LARP and the failure of market forces when applied to the hobby. This series is derived from one of the keynote lectures which I gave at Camelot UK LARP conference held in November 2019.

  • The first blog of this series, about LARP and the Failure of Market Forces, can be found here.
  • The second in the series, about What LARP Should Cost, can be found here.
  • The fourth post discussing What are we Charging? can be found here.


The 1am Sunday morning plot meeting
The 1am Sunday morning plot meeting
The 1am Sunday plot meeting

This is the second of a series of articles about the economics of larp and the failure of market forces when applied to the hobby. You can find the first of these articles here.

I’m afraid this post in particular is numbers heavy, due to the subject matter. I apologise if it is hard going, but I can’t think how to reason my way through this topic without including the numbers. Sorry.

This series arose after I was asked to give one of the keynote lectures at Camelot UK LARP conference held in November 2019. I wanted to explore the finances of a larp event and investigate what it would have cost if we were running an event as a commercial, money making venture.

To do so, I have looked at the budget of…


This is a series of blog posts based on my Keynote presentation at Camelot UK LARP Conference held in Birmingham on 23rd September 2019.

  • The second in the series, about What LARP Should Cost, can be found here.
  • The third in this blog series, discussing What do Other Similar Pastimes Charge? can be found here.
  • The fourth post discussing What are we Charging? can be found here.


A mature approach to roleplaying.

I’ve been pondering this topic for a little while, and have discussed it with a few people, but it’s taken a while to get to something that I can attempt to articulate in a coherent fashion.

I played a LRP game a few weeks ago which had a some rather fun game mechanics. In order to control players heading off to explore a new area, they set up a few conceits to manage how many people could go out, and how often. The game was set in a moon base, and to go outside the main base you had to…


Me, at All for One, on the left of the picture. Photo credit Tom Garnett

LARP by the power of spreadsheets!

All for One was a major logistical challenge in ways which differed significantly from any live-roleplay event which Crooked House or LarpX had run in the past. We ambitiously decided to use the Cinedrama System to ‘film’ five concurrent films over the course of the weekend. Effectively we were trying to run five LARP events simultaneously, each for seven people, with overlapping plots, NPCs, props and locations.

If you didn’t attend All for One, I suggest you read Ian’s blog about game design before you go any further as it explains the structure of…


I have recently been a player at The Quota, which was a dystopian dark future roleplaying event, set in a chronologically very close future and in an utterly believable world.

The background setting was that following Brexit, the UK became more fascist and right wing and eventually Scotland and Wales voted for devolution. They had most of the UK’s water, which they were restricting and selling back to England at a profit. They also developed more permissive political climate and in conjunction with the economic situation were seen as more attractive and therefore suffered mass immigration. …


This is the sixth of a series of blogs on the subject of alien and monster biology. The first, which covers respiration, can be found here.

Reproduction can take various forms, but allows a race to produce a new generation of offspring.

Sexual reproduction in mammals occurs where two adults have sex, one carries the young and gives birth. There is usually a standard gestation period as the young mature and then the carrying parent gives birth, exposing them to the outside world.


This is the fifth of a series of blogs on the subject of alien and monster biology. The first, which covers respiration, can be found here.

All living things respond to stimuli. These stimuli can take many forms, but include:

Rachel Thomas

Vet, likes all things animal. Roleplayer, LARP & Crooked House LRP. Plays and organises interactive narrative fiction. Travels as Vetvoyages.

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