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Photo by visuals on Unsplash

It was a cold, crisp day on February 9, 1950, when Senator Joe McCarthy waived a “damning” piece of paper before the Ohio County Women’s Club in Wheeling, West Virginia.

“I have here in my hand,” he said, “a list of two hundred [State Department employees] that were known to the Secretary of State as being members of the Communist Party and who nevertheless are still working and shaping the policy of the State Department.”

Senator McCarthy then proceeded to fly round the country telling anyone who would listen that he had a blacklist full of nefarious government employees. Several. Did he ever provide substantial evidence? …


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A few days ago, I opened up my Linkedin profile and was greeted with a Facebook clone. It seems like websites are all pushing towards a singular design that is mobile first — fat headers and cute icons are all the rage now. But that’s not because these designers are part of a cabal bent on taking over the world with eye-catching designs.

It’s because Google is really pushing Progressive Web Apps, a way to fix the distribution problems faced by app development. The costs involved in app development and the resulting overhead can kill profitability. To fix this, web apps are becoming more and more mobile friendly. Why spend millions on app development when you can create an app-like experience on the web? …


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You can think of a JavaScript class as a house that contain variables and functions. The same reason we use a variable to store numbers is the same reason we use a class to store functions; we want to be able to create a pattern that allows us to reuse information in an efficient way.

But classes are special because they work like a blue print for other people to use and build cool things with. For example, I can have a class that’s called Warrior.

I can “instantiate” or create an object of the class by writing:

let bruceLee = Warrior.create(“Bruce Lee”)…


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Free access does not mean open source software has to be free of cost. There are ways to alleviate the pressure of having to continuously maintain projects that suck valuable time away, time you’re happy to share, but time nonetheless. The problem arises when money is introduced to a community that balks at the mention of commercialism as it pertains to open source. …


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Photo by Stephen Leonardi on Unsplash

This isn’t a blog post about how to get rich — no one gets rich, they become rich. More on that difference in some other post.

Rather, this is a post about how to be rich; in other words, how to live in a state of wealth.

First, you have to buy property, because what’s the point of money if you can’t park it on some juicy piece of land, right? But you can’t just buy any kind of property — you don’t want to be like those people.

No, you have to buy property that only exists on postcards. Note however that these postcard properties usually don’t reside near elite school districts. If you have kids or are planning to have kids, you might actually have to live next to people. Maybe you can make that postcard property your vacation property or something. You know, for when dealing with neighbors gets to be too much. Though, if you choose wisely, you might have a neighbor who is domiciled in the far east. …


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I had just finished my short story about a girl escaping a convent with a baby born out of wedlock. I’d treated the fiction writing tips that my professor had provided like the word of God.

It was decent, I thought. I might not get shredded during the peer review session. So, I mass emailed the Word doc to my peers.

The time for the peer review finally came. My heart decided to audition for Cirque du Soleil.

The professor had some good things to say about it. There weren’t many negative comments. I thought maybe they might have been holding back punches. …


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There’s something poignant, poetic even, about a black slave smoking tobacco knowing he’s going to be whipped and dismembered while white women watch and white men scorn. This seminal scene marks the beginning of an end to a long spree of violence that has followed Oroonoko’s heels, a conclusion where the silent mass, the greedy owners, and the many tyrants are all complicit in the great tragedy of the slave trade. Aphra Behn’s portrayal of Oroonoko’s apparent indifference to his impending doom gives him the appearance of a martyr, putting into question Behn’s motives and her representation of Oroonoko’s heroism.

Behn serves two audiences: her morals qualms and the white public. A truly epic death would not appease her audience, so Behn flirts with the theme of honorable death in several stages of Oroonoko’s rebellion. In the battle between Oroonoko and the deputy governor, the governor realizes that Oroonoko is “resolved to die fighting” (Oroonoko 129). So, instead of killing him, he tricks Oroonoko into surrendering, thereafter whipping Oroonoko. In this instance, Behn’s readers, at the time, would have been appeased knowing that justice was served. Meanwhile, Behn is able to slyly place her sympathy with Oroonoko by portraying the governor as a villainous schemer while gracing Oroonoko with dignity. …


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After Herbert Hoover’s presidency, the suffering American poor were ready for laws that would do away with the unregulated laissez-faire economy. John Steinbeck’s novel, Grapes of Wrath, embodies the New Deal and a shift towards government regulation by presenting Weedpatch Camp.

To understand how Weedpatch Camp embodies the values of the New Deal, one must look at how Steinbeck and FDR align themselves with the migrant workers. At the start of the novel, the farmers are kicked off their land by men who are tied to the banks. …


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For many Americans, the thought that there’s a social media universe outside of Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat is inconceivable. We’ve grown accustomed to their dominance. But there’s an app company in Beijing, China that eclipsed Uber to become the most valuable startup as of November. The company is called ByteDance.

You’ve probably never heard of it, because the company functions as a sort of manufacturer of apps. Unlike Facebook or Snap Inc, companies that are built primarily around an original app, ByteDance positions itself as product company that integrates Machine Learning algorithms into their products. On its website the company states that the founder of the company, Zhang Yiming, “saw an opportunity to combine the power of artificial intelligence with the growth of mobile internet to revolutionize the way people consume and receive information. This made ByteDance one of the first companies to launch mobile-first products powered by machine learning technology. …

About

Raji Ayinla

J.D candidate 2022; Associate Member of New England Law Review; Owner of howtocodejs.com; email queries to rajiayinla858@gmail.com

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