The Myth of Doing What You Love
umair haque
88022

Great write-up Umair!

I got deeply moved by two specific moments in life, that have shaped most of what I am doing nowadays:

  1. at the end of my bank apprenticeship (back then in 1988 my plan was to become a stoke broker) all of our group got a chance to work a few months at the bank before heading to university or other ventures. My dream was to work in the stoke brokerage department. However, it turned out to be a position in the public real estate department. Nothing would have been wrong with that, but I heard from a classmate that he got a job in the stock brokerage department, whereas he would have liked to get a job in the real estate department. What a waste of passion, and energy!
  2. when the “Wall” came down and Germany reunited, I moved to study on economics in Bamberg (a mere 30 km from the Thuringia border). Being one of the only students in my student dorm, I curiously toured into what was a foreign country just months ago. Talking to locals, exploring villages, countryside, and visiting companies (such as the glass industry in Lauscha). I always was amazed to see, and hear how people were managing with creativity and skillful innovation (using the resources at hand) to achieve the organizational goals. Yet neither in the media nor in the general business community in Western Germany (the region where I came from) this was taken into account. Two and a half decades later, with massive public funding (local) people, almost have given up.

When in 2008 the financial crisis was about to hit I got invited to visit a “management school without teachers” (quote by Peter Senge, author of “The Fifth Discipline”) to “watch the Penguins arrive” (the freshmen coming to http://tiimiakatemia.fi/en).

… here the journey since then (with ups and down), driven by a deep intention to bring a shift to the region and its people that I have begun to love since I was here the first time: http://leanthinkers.blogspot.de/2008/11/team-action-learning-journey-into-future.html

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