Reviving Furby with 21st century marketing thinking

Furby was the most successful toy of my childhood. In the early 2000s and late 90s, Furby toys were the most popular and desired toys amongst children ages 4–12.

The key aspect of the toy was that it was able to interact with their users via simple movement of their eyes, feet and a few recorded phrases conditioned to be given as response to a limited number of stimuli.

The design of the toy was also appealing to children. Furby looked like a furry animal with big eyes which moved simulating blinking.

Furby has remained on the market for all this time, however it is no longer the leader within its segment. I was thinking of ways that modern marketing could bring Furby back to being the leader in it’s category. Here are some ideas:

Connectivity — make Furby connect to a mobile device (parent and/or child’s device).

Language apps integrations — make Furby integrate with language learning apps such as DuoLingo or Babbel in order to teach children new languages through play.

Alexa integration — make Furby the personal assistant of your child, helping out with homework and solving simple tasks as well as provide simple feedback on problem solving.

Mobility — make Furby able to mimic human movement as well as behave more or less like a robot and follow children around the house via a tracking device.

Personalisation — ability to fully personalise your Furby toy from a choice of colours, fur textures and voices.

By following the See-Think-Do-Care model, we will move on to outlining key processes which would help with reviving the brand from a commercial/marketing perspective:

See:

Various content aimed at demonstrating the new product features delivered on brand-complementary blogs and websites, with a focus on video and YouTube as a social channel.

Blogger/social outreach aimed at children’s parents as a target audience with a play on the learning capabilities of the new Furby toy.

Optimisation for searches around “toys” and “children learning” or “learning gamification”.

Think

Website:

Engaging, interactive website appealing to children which would also be very easy to use for adults.

Detailed product description on the website with video demonstrations of all capabilities.

Social:

Integrated social channels with streamlined content showcasing product features appealing to both children and parents as main target audiences.

Do

Partnerships with main retailers for easy buy and price promotions.

Click-to-buy options on the website with one click orders delivered straight to your home.

Care:

Customer service 24/7.

5 year (or more) guarantee and free toy care.