“Budh”, a short film by Prashant Ingole, a recipient of various short film award selections, focuses on women empowerment. The movie throws light on women, who are otherwise worlds apart, but share a common life when seen through the lens of injustice and gender prejudice. The three prominent categories of women portrayed in the film are found to hail from different socio-economic, cultural and educational backgrounds. But there is a common thread of patriarchal subjugation and patterned oppression that neatly runs through their lives irrespective of their class, caste and other differences.

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The youngest girl among the protagonists was Yvonne, from a city, leading a modern, relatively liberal and upscale life. She, being the youngest of all protagonists, realizes her worth, value of choice and decisions much before the other protagonists in the film. Her acceptance of the existence of male supremacy and recognition of the harm it causes to the attitude towards a woman led her to pave a path for apprehending her own decision without caring for others judgment. Yvonne was betrayed by her boyfriend, a male chauvinist who used to often demean women’s feelings and choices. She was an unmarried woman, which made her free enough to make her own choices, as she was not restrained by the institution of marriage which values just the male members of the family.This was evident when she spoke out about wanting to stay away from her boyfriend,when she gets to know he was disloyal towards her. …


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Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/news/artist-wants-your-menstrual-blood-performance-piece-de-stigmatising-periods-10486717.html

We are in a world today that appreciates awareness. From non-governmental organizations to health and educational ministries, everyone wishes to speak about topics that are considered taboo. While the effort is appreciable, the taboo topics are dealt with objectively, as if it can be defined in a straightforward, scientific manner. Yet, there is so much that remains in the shadows, so much that is not engaged with, left unsaid.

As a sexuality and menstrual educator, it is a part of my job to talk about menstruation. Yet I struggle. How do I define menstruation? Who does the tale of blood speak about? What is the story behind whispers that passes among circles, whispers carefully coded, whispers that reek of enforced silences? …


Considering how interesting at the same time highly impactful animation as a medium is, Muskaan in this regard is no exception. This film deftly puts across a very thought-provoking message in a lucid ‘story-telling’ fashion within just 20 minutes. Directed by Avinash Medhe, one of the founders of Girgit Studios, it was featured on March 8, 2017 in Shimla as an initiative of the Directorate of Women and Child Development, Himachal Pradesh.

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Shedding some light on the backdrop, Muskaan showcases the rural landscape fraught with stereotypical mental backwardness and highlights different sets of characters embodying the various mindsets commonly manifested in society. It points out the rigidity of cultural dogmas predominantly associated with the obsession over male hierarchy and aims to dismantle the gender prejudices rampant in several pockets of our country.

About

Rangeen Khidki

We work with urban as well as rural youth and women on Gender & Sexuality, Sexual Reproductive Health Rights, mental health, education and life skills.

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