Interactive 2018 World Cup Visualization

Originally posted on my website, https://ryanaltobello.com/

12 August 2018

This coding adventure of mine began at the perfect time for a sports enthusiast: the 2018 World Cup! I was interested in gathering some data and putting together a visualization showing a map of participating countries, and the number of players from top leagues that got called to their national team for the greatest sporting event in the world.

What started out as a simple visualization, my first one ever in fact, quickly ballooned into a grand display. I wanted a map which people could move, zoom, click on, filter by, all the good stuff I had no idea how to do. It was time to embark on what I like to call the “Tutorial Tour.”

You know the one, where you get halfway through one tutorial then find a “better” one and jump ship, then find one that also teaches a technique you’ve been wanting to learn, and before you know it you’ve visited them all. I learned how to build a Python webscraper and how to navigate Tableau, so it was time to get busy. I wrote the webscraper to extract the national team, the current squad for that team, and the club teams for the current squad from 2018 Fifa World Cup Wiki. Of course, I accidentally saved over it for my next project, so I no longer have that one. D’oh!

From there it was a simple matter of organizing the data in Excel, importing it to Tableau and playing around with settings until I got the dashboard layout and features I wanted. I only included 5 leagues(Premier League, Bundesliga, La Liga, Serie A, and Ligue 1), to keep it simple and so I could show the bar graph of the clubs to easily compare the number of players from those clubs that made national teams for the 2018 World Cup.

Users can sort by league, country, or club team to see a number of results. For example, when a country is selected, the dashboard will show the players that play for that national team, and the leagues and clubs for which they play, for the 5 leagues included.

So I present to you, the first visualization I’ve ever created! The interactive is too big to embed on here, so if you’d like to play around with it, you can simply follow the following link to my Tableau Public profile where you can access the visualization. For best results, there’s a button in the bottom right to expand to fullscreen.

View interactive visualization now on Tableau Public!