Iran photos/captions (fans story)

A young girl sits among the over-300 male supporters in the Rah Ahan Stadium for the second-tier football league match between Baadraan Tehran and Naft Masjed Soleyman. Due to Iran’s strict religious guidelines, girls are banned from men’s games once they start wearing the hijab — a head-covering veil worn as a symbol of modesty — typically when they hit puberty. PHOTO: SAMUEL HE
On some occasions, family members of club officials and national players, and female journalists are allowed into stadiums for men’s games. Baadraan Tehran manager Farshid Ghorbanian’s female relative, the only woman present, sat quietly inside the VIP Box for the entire match while the men around her cheered their team on. PHOTO: SAMUEL HE
Fans of Baadraan Tehran chant “hamleh”, which means “attack” in Farsi, while clapping loudly. Religious leaders in Iran oppose women attending men’s games as these events are deemed unsuitable for them, due to the rowdy atmosphere and sometimes crude cheering by the men. PHOTO: SAMUEL HE
Fans of Baadraan Tehran chant “hamleh”, which means “attack” in Farsi, while clapping loudly. Religious leaders in Iran oppose women attending men’s games as these events are deemed unsuitable for them, due to the rowdy atmosphere and sometimes crude cheering by the men. PHOTO: SAMUEL HE
A young girl rises through a retractable car roof, swinging the colours of Shiraz-based Qashqai Football Club. The second-tier team had knocked out national powerhouse Persepolis Football Club in Iran’s Hazfi Cup, leading to zealous fan celebrations during a massive evening jam on Chamran Boulevard. PHOTO: LIEW YU WEI
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