By Layla Haidrani

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Last December I was whisked away to Cuba, where I gained an engagement ring and future husband. But news of coronavirus wasn’t far behind. Many brides-to-be balked when the government banned weddings in March, then reinstated them with a 15-person guest list in late September — leading three-quarters of couples to postpone their wedding until 2021 or face the other option, a micro-wedding — but I actually felt a little bit of relief.

While I’ve always celebrated milestones like birthdays, anniversaries, promotions and career successes, the idea of wedding planning exhausted me. My partner Jay is more of a saver to my spender but we were in agreement that we wanted a smaller affair. As we traipsed around wedding fairs across the country, the mere thought of picking a venue — and sorting out seating plans so that squabbling relatives I hadn’t seen in years wouldn’t disrupt the celebrations — filled me with dread. But weddings tend to be sold in popular culture as the biggest day of your life and I couldn’t escape the feeling that I was in a battle to ‘one-up’ the nuptials I had seen on Instagram. …


By Erika Smith

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY LULA HYERS.

We know there’s a wide variation in how people with vulvas experience orgasm. Some come easily, while others might go their whole lives without one. But why? Some researchers suggest how often you orgasm during P-in-V sex has to do with the location of your clitoris. Specifically, the distance between your clitoris and vagina (C-V distance), or the distance between your clitoris and your urethral meatus, or urethral opening (CUMD).

According to the Los Angeles Times, this idea goes back to the 1920s, when Princess Marie Bonaparte — a psychoanalyst, Napoleon’s great-grandniece, and a close friend of Sigmund Freud — got frustrated with her own lack of orgasm and began gathering data from her patients. She found that women with a clitoris fewer than 2.5 centimetres from their vagina — around the distance of the tip of the thumb to the first knuckle — orgasmed more frequently during penis-in-vagina sex. She called this the “rule of thumb”. Eventually, Bonaparte underwent two experimental surgeries in an attempt to bring her clitoris closer to her vagina — which, according to ABC News, didn’t go so well. …


By Erika Smith

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We know that orgasms can be accompanied by moaning, shaking, and even squirting. But what about crying? Crying during orgasm, sometimes called “crymaxing,” can be surprising if it happens to you. But it actually makes a lot of sense.

When we orgasm, our brains and bodies are flooded with hormones, including surges of oxytocin (the “cuddle hormone”) and dopamine (the “happy hormone”). …

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