You’re not from here, so go home…

Indigenous: native to the place where found.

It should bother you when you hear the word alien applied to another human being. No human is an alien on this planet.

Nation borders are not organic, they are artifical fabrications — manmade segregational divisions— imaginary lines.

When an archeologist uncovers the remains of a Terran life-form, one of the things they try to determine is if that life-form originated in the area where it is being dug up. If that is confirmed, it can be documented that the life form is indigenous, or autochthonous. But that specificity is not applicable outside the archeological world of tracing artifact geo-origins.

Two point to consider:

  1. Since all life on this planet has the common bond of the need for water to survive, it could be theoretically generalized that all earth-beings are from one family—the Water Family.
  2. Furthermore, since borders are only lines drawn on maps by humans, the concept of any earth-based lifeform as ‘alien’ only relates to these artificial imaginary lines.

Therefore, no living earth creature from the Water Family can honestly be an alien to Earth.

Insomuch as these two points are accurate, it should bother you when you hear the term applied as it relates to the rights of whom (beings) is permitted to go where (location on the planet).


Or, maybe it doesn’t bother you that much.

It DOES bother me — enough to write this post — and enough to have written a lyric on this topic for the song ‘Born Here’ from my most recent musical release, IDIO.


Although I consider myself a spiritually-based person, I adopt a predominant amount of my world-perspectives from science-fiction writers.

When humans were called ‘ugly bags of mostly water’ in a Next Generation episode called ‘Home Soil’ it made an impression on me, as it aptly describes what unifies us as a species.

Without water, we all die.

I start my song lyrics with that inspiration:

Bringing you water, bringing the water,
bringing your water, bring me water
Everyone’s water, you are of water,
I am of water, we are water

I then have some lyrical phonetic fun in a style loosely inspired by ‘Jon Anderson’ in the next couple stanzas:

You wanna take it out
You wanna break it out
You wanna shake it out
and stake it out and make it out
You gotta bring it in,
you gotta get the win,
you gotta take the spin
and break the wind
and save your skin
Say that you are gonna, say that you wanna,
say that you shoulda, coulda, oughta
Say that you mean it, say that you swear it,
say that you care and you dare to be there for it

I then put in a stanza more directly tied to the theme of ‘borders’:

Why look outside
when the truth is inside
in a place where hope cannot hide,
cannot steal, cannot lie
Borders collide, battle cries,
sides take sides,
minds devise the divide to demise
realized in the tear of a child’s eye

When I write lyrics, I have the opportunity to discuss issues that are important to me, and hopefully relevant to our world in some way. I have always been most inspired by lyricists who write about topics other than the typical love song, or songs about sex, drugs, cars, or ‘na na na, la la la’ — I don’t mean to come off as a ‘lyric’ snob because I don’t hate the non-deep lyrics, I’m just not inclined to write like that, nor do I feel particularly skilled toward that fashion.

I already mentioned Jon Anderson of Yes, but I was also influenced early on to become a lyricist by artists such as Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), Neil Peart (Rush), Kerry Livgren (Kansas) — there have since been many other influential lyricists that I respect as poets.

A bonus is at the end of my song is when I put forth my best Jean-Luc Picard impersonation…

If you’d like to take a listen to Born Here, there is a SoundCloud link below these paragraphs, as well as the full lyric-poem.

Of course, I’d love it if you’d add my songs to your streaming playlists or better yet, buy a download or a CD from the many links you find online — click here for a list of links where you can do just that.

Born Here
(Autochthonous Anthem)
Bringing you water, bringing the water,
bringing your water, bring me water
Everyone’s water, you are of water,
I am of water, we are water
You wanna take it out
You wanna break it out
You wanna shake it out
and stake it out and make it out
You gotta bring it in,
you gotta get the win,
you gotta take the spin
and break the wind
and save your skin
Say that you are gonna, say that you wanna,
say that you shoulda, coulda, oughta
Say that you mean it, say that you swear it,
say that you care and you dare to be there for it
Why look outside
when the truth is inside
in a place where hope cannot hide,
cannot steal, cannot lie
Borders collide, battle cries,
sides take sides,
minds devise the divide to demise
realized in the tear of a child’s eye
You see it, yes you do,
a chance to follow through,
it’s right in front of you,
beside of you, you know it’s true
You see a better day,
you feel, you share, you play,
you separate the colors
from the shades of dreary gray
(Spoken) We are born here, we all are born here on this planet. Among us are no aliens, no immigrants, no refugees — we are all humans from one earth — borders are not organic — each person is one-hundred percent autochthonous.

Regardless of skin color, flag or theology and in spite of borders, barriers and bigotry. Water unites us. Therein, I believe that our species CAN CHOOSE to see beyond that which divides us.

Download or purchase the entire CD at: cdbaby.com/cd/rejyna3

iTunes: Born Here (Autochthonous)

Amazon: Born Here

YouTube: Born Here

Spotify: Born Here

GooglePlay: Born Here

Amazon UK: Born Here

© Rejyna Douglass-Whitman (BMI)
Published by W.E./Citadel of Cynosure Productions (BMI)
All Rights Reserved.