What if streaming payments would really catch on in the future? How would that look like? This was the question I asked myself publically during a Saturday morning breakfast. In the Redefining … series, I take on a concept and try to improve it or place it in a different context. For more tips about creating great cryptocurrency products and services, check out my other Medium articles, or the free book that I’m currently writing at redesigningbitcoin.com.

In this article, I’ll design a universal streaming payment app. So let’s dive into this, and see where it will end*

Streaming micropayments

Digital technology allows us to build more fine-grained, on-demand services, tailor-made for the situation. Instead of buying a full album from a physical store, Napster and Apple completely changed the business model by downloading a single song, anytime, and from anywhere. Taking this one step further, and we might end up with more dynamic payments. …


How do you introduce cryptocurrencies to millions of people unfamiliar with these new and innovative concepts? In the Redesigning … series, I review some mobile crypto applications and highlight some of the good, the bad, and the ugly design decisions. For more tips about creating great cryptocurrency products and services, check my other Medium articles, or the free book that I’m currently writing at redesigningbitcoin.com.

In this article, I’ll go through some Coinbase mobile apps. Coinbase is one of the major cryptocurrency platforms servicing customers all over the world. Their mission is to create an open financial system for the world. …


Every app needs a bit of design love now and then. Don’t be that team that neglects their app once it gets into the app store. In the Redesigning … series, I review some mobile crypto applications and highlight some of the good, the bad, and the ugly design decisions. For more tips about creating great cryptocurrency products and services, check my other Medium articles, or the free book that I’m currently writing at redesigningbitcoin.com.

In this article, I’ll go through the Celsius mobile app. Celsius Network operates in the DeFi (short for Decentralized Finance) space by offering competitive loans and interests on cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, altcoins, and stablecoins. Their mission is to onboard millions of people around the world who are not necessarily familiar with cryptocurrencies. …


This article is part two of a two-part series, where I will extend the current best practices with some new ideas. If you haven’t read part one yet, you can go back here by reading about some of the current best practices in mobile cryptocurrency wallets. The concepts below are just a handful of ideas and suggestions to differentiate from other wallets and taking it to the next level.

Adding fun

New technologies can be scary at first. But when an app looks like fun, it may become less intimidating to try it out. Why so serious? There is no need to keep everything related to technology and finance, so functional and formal. Adding a bit of humor or unexpected delighters can help even the most tedious tasks become a little more enjoyable to complete. Maybe some app developers are afraid of doing it wrong and perhaps hurting their brand by trying too hard. To those I say, keep it small and do not overdo it. But it does not hurt observing other apps that are successful in mastering these micro-interactions. Even including a single enjoyable moment within your app, might just be enough to stand out from all other apps that do not. Without going into too many details, what could you do in a cryptocurrency wallet? One thing that often works is celebrating success (peak-end rule) after completing something such as a tutorial, payment, or including 2-factor security. Cryptocurrency communities are really into memes and animated gifs. So why not include some of those with sound and glitters? Decide for yourself how “over the top” you are willing to go. Another approach is to include gamification aspects into your app in order to drive positive behavior like learning and mastering self-custody. Adding fun elements doesn’t necessarily have to be a large part of your app. …


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As a designer, I often seek the latest mobile applications with clever and inspiring UX/UI designs. By openly sharing the work we do as designers, I believe we can improve together and raise the bar for better user experiences. This article is part one of a two-part series, where I will highlight some of the best practices currently found in cryptocurrency wallets. In part two, I will extend the current best practices with some additional improvements.

Optimized onboarding

Making a good first impression is crucial to new users. Anything that might hinder them from using your app straight away might become an excuse to replace your wallet app for another one. For this reason, some wallets optimize for speed and efficiency by minimizing launch time, skipping introductions, and postponing recommended security measures. This approach is especially appealing to impatient users or users that are somewhat familiar with managing cryptocurrencies and understand the risks of taking shortcuts. However, users new to cryptocurrencies may benefit from a little bit of extra guidance and support. By knowing what type of user is using your app, you can customize content towards their needs and getting the right things done as quickly as possible. The quickest way to find out is to offer an explicit option to skip any initial support, such as writing down a seed phrase, and the dangers of doing so. …


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As someone who enjoys making coffee, I noticed some similarities between designing blockchain solutions and creating a great cup of coffee. For starters, there are customers with different tastes and preferences. Some like a small cup of espresso, and others prefer beautifully crafted latte art. A professional barista can apply his or her skills to create whatever the customer desires. This action often entails a slight adjustment of the grind size, changing the coffee to water ratio, and adding additional ingredients such as sweeteners, milk, and so on. Blockchain solutions are not much different from this either. Customers have specific goals and needs, and designers/developers/architects compose a blockchain solution in such a way that it fulfills whatever the customer desires. But instead of tweaking coffee beans and ratio’s, what is often changed are the consensus models, rules, permissions, and governance of a blockchain platform. Modular solutions such as Hyperledger are especially good at tweaking all the components so that companies end up with their own customized and tailor-made solution. But after how many alterations should we stop calling it a blockchain and start calling it a replicated database? And is iced coffee still a type of coffee? …

René Jeronimus

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