Rho AI was founded in 2012 and has never had a central office. Now, with 8 years of a 100% remote workplace and nearly 30 employees, we’ve learned a thing or two about strategies for successful remote work.

Camping in Montana on July 3rd, 2019. Flights were much better getting there earlier but I still had to work on the 3rd. Thankfully, my brother is fully prepared with a solar panel (off screen), large battery pack, and an LTE hotspot. 100% remote means I was fully operational all day, video calls included!

In order to make this quasi-scientific (and, of course, to generate some appealing graphs for this post) we sent a survey to the Rho AI team. I will walk through anecdotes and detail on each section but, for the tl;dr; in all of us, here are Rho’s 4 key elements to remote success:

1. Video First

2. Focus on Outcome, Not Timecard


And, why should you work here?

Rho AI was founded in 2012 by a small team of entrepreneurs, data scientists, and engineers. We set out to develop custom software for professional motorsports to predict an optimal race strategy (our initial concept also turned out to be effective in optimizing line-ups for fantasy teams, but we left that behind). Since then, our real-time strategy recommendations have factored heavily into multiple victories and we are proud to count Richard Childress Racing, Hendrick Motorsports, and General Motors as some of our partners.

Much of the founding team came from the venture-backed startup world and understand the benefits and disadvantages…


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At Rho AI, we constantly evaluate the latest & greatest technologies to see what works best and where we can improve our products. A shift over the last several years has been the explosion of ‘managed services,’ which we define as cloud providers offering SaaS products for everything from databases to computational tasks.

It is essential that technical organizations continuously evaluate what technologies they use, why they are using them, and who is managing them. …


There are currently two ways to run health checks in Rancher: HTTP and TCP (http://docs.rancher.com/rancher/latest/en/cattle/health-checks/). The former is relatively straightforward, however it requires that you have a web server with an available route able to respond with a 2xx/3xx. TCP checks are a nice option for services without a web server, as you can do it in a lightweight fashion.

We built a very simple TCP server that we use in a lot of our services. This has one task: allowing an agent to open a connection to a specified port. …


At Rho AI we commonly interface with business leaders who may not be technical but need to understand how Artificial Intelligence (AI) can impact their business. In this post, we provide a high-level introduction to identifying AI opportunities within your existing organization and how to best capitalize on those opportunities.

Article 1:

How to Spot a Machine Learning Opportunity, Even If You Aren’t a Data Scientist

SYLVERARTS/ISTOCK

Summary:

To understand what a machine learning model does, let’s start with a simple example. Think back to your days of high school algebra, where you learned that the relationship for a straight line…


There are currently two ways to run health checks in Rancher: HTTP and TCP (http://docs.rancher.com/rancher/latest/en/cattle/health-checks/). The former is relatively straightforward, however it requires that you have a web server with an available route able to respond with a 2xx/3xx. TCP checks are a nice option for services without a web server, as you can do it in a lightweight fashion.

We built a very simple TCP server that we use in a lot of our services. This has one task: allowing an agent to open a connection to a specified port. …


The notion of Spot Instances is a difficult concept after years of thinking of servers as ‘stable’ until such time as you shut them down. As it turns out, however, there is an ever-increasing list of scenarios that benefit from spot instances.

While cost-reduction is clearly a primary benefit of spot instances, the benefits don’t stop there. On a purely technical level, their use forces you to architect your applications to be more modular and resilient, which I believe is a good thing. …


It is very helpful (and wise) to keep tabs on your servers’ resource utilization — hence the rise of services like NewRelic and DataDog, along with applications such as Nagios.

If you search for the general topic of “Docker Host Monitoring”, the majority of articles and available tools relate to monitoring the Docker *containers*. While this clearly has its place, it does not allow you to monitor the *host machine* resources.

The tools that do exist for *host machine* monitoring almost exclusively depend on installing some sort of agent software on the host machine itself. This is at odds with…

Rho AI

Rho AI builds customized data science products and services to solve real-world problems.

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