This post is based on a talk about a paper published at the 2020 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2020). The full research paper by Richmond Wong, Vera Khovanskaya, Sarah Fox, Nick Merrill, and Phoebe Sengers “Infrastructural Speculations: Tactics for Designing and Interrogating Lifeworlds “ can be found here: [Official ACM Version] [Open Access Pre-Print Version]

In our paper, we ask how speculative design can be used to more explicitly center and raise questions about the broader social, technical, and political worlds in which speculative artifacts exist. To do so, we draw connections between speculative…


From some recent conversations that I’ve had, I’ve been reflecting on what I might put on a reading list or syllabus to try to introduce someone to HCI perspectives on “values in design” and thought I’d put them together here! Some of this draws on the syllabus from “ Technology and Delegation,” the Berkeley School of Information graduate course I helped teach with Deirdre Mulligan for a couple of years.

These are predominantly pieces that I’ve found useful for my own thinking, or useful in a teaching context. As such, it’s a necessarily partial list. …


After the 2019 CHI conference (technically the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) and writing about our own paper on design approaches to privacy, I wanted to highlight other work that I found interesting or thought provoking in a sort of annotated bibliography. Listed in no particular order, though most relate to one or more themes that I’m interested in (privacy, design research, values in design practice, critical approaches, and speculative design).

(I’m still working through the stack of CHI papers that I downloaded to read, so hopefully this is part 1 of two or three posts).


This post is based on a talk given at the 2019 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2019), in Glasgow, UK. The full research paper by Richmond Wong and Deirdre Mulligan that the talk is based on, “Bringing Design to the Privacy Table: Broadening “Design” in “Privacy by Design” Through the Lens of HCI” can be found here:
[Official ACM Version] [Open Access Pre-Print Version]

In our paper “Bringing Design to the Privacy Table: Broadening Design in Privacy by Design,” we conduct a curated literature review to make two conceptual argument arguments:

  1. There is a broad…

This post summarizes a research paper, Bringing Design to the Privacy Table, written by Richmond Wong and Deirdre Mulligan. The paper will be presented at the 2019 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2019) on Wednesday, May 8 at the 4pm “Help Me, I’m Only Human” paper session.

How might the richness and variety in human computer interaction (HCI) design practices and approaches be utilized in addressing privacy during the development of technologies?

U.S. policy recommendations and the E.U.’s General Data Protection have helped concept of privacy by design (PBD) — embedding privacy protections into products during…


This blog post is a version of a talk given at the 2018 ACM Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW) Conference based on a paper written by Richmond Wong, Deirdre Mulligan, Ellen Van Wyk, John Chuang, and James Pierce, entitled Eliciting Values Reflections by Engaging Privacy Futures Using Design Workbooks, which was honored with a best paper award. Find out more on our project page, our summary blog post, or download the paper: [PDF link] [ACM link]

In the work described in our paper, we created a set of conceptual speculative designs to explore privacy issues around emerging…


This post summarizes a research paper, Eliciting Values Reflections by Engaging Privacy Futures Using Design Workbooks, co-authored with Deirdre Mulligan, Ellen Van Wyk, John Chuang, and James Pierce. The paper will be presented at the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW) on Monday November 5th (in the afternoon Privacy in Social Media session).

Recent wearable and sensing devices, such as Google Glass, Strava, and internet-connected toys have raised questions about ways in which privacy and other social values might be implicated by their development, use, and adoption. At the same time, legal, policy, and technical advocates…


This blog post is a version of a talk I gave at the 2018 ACM Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) Conference based on a paper written with Nick Merrill and John Chuang, entitled When BCIs have APIs: Design Fictions of Everyday Brain-Computer Interface Adoption as part of the UC Berkeley BioSENSE lab. Find out more on our project page, or download the paper: [PDF link] [ACM link]

In recent years, brain computer interfaces, or BCIs, have shifted from far-off science fiction, to medical research, to the realm of consumer-grade devices that can sense brainwaves and EEG signals. Brain computer interfaces have…


This post is a version of a talk given at the 2017 ACM Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) Conference on a paper by Richmond Wong, Ellen Van Wyk, and James Pierce, Real-Fictional Entanglements: Using Science Fiction and Design Fiction to Interrogate Sensing Technologies in which we used a science fiction novel as the starting point for creating a set of design fictions to explore issues around privacy. This blog post is also cross-posted on my blog, The Bytegeist. Find out more on our project page, or download the paper: [PDF link ] [ACM link]

Many emerging and proposed sensing technologies raise…


This is part 3 in a 3 part series of posts based on work I presented at Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) in 2016 on analyzing concept videos. Read part 1, part 2, or find out more about the project on the project page or download the full paper.

After doing a close reading and analyzing the concept videos for Google Glass (a pair of glasses with a heads up display) and Microsoft HoloLens (a pair of augmented reality goggles), we also looked at media reaction to these videos and these products’ announcements.

After both concept videos were released, media authors…

Richmond Wong

Postdoctoral Researcher @ UC Berkeley Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity: values & ethics in design, speculative design, science & technology studies.

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