Are you trolling or do you really believe that the colonial powers’ behavior exemplified the…
rnlocnil
41

I did not “exemplify” or condone colonialism. I pointed out the historical fact that the colonial powers brought with them the values and practices and culture of rule of law, civil service, sound government and education; and that those values and governments were intact when the colonial powers were booted out. India still retains that, decades after booting out the British. South Africa still retains that, although it is struggling. The colonial nations of the Americas gained their independence yet retained those values and notions of good government.

Rhodesia was a successful nation when the whites were booted out, and since has been a failed dictatorship. Just one example. For the most part, sub-Saharan African nations have succumbed to corrupt dictatorships and/or kleptocracies, civil wars, religious wars, tribal wars, and struggling economies.

It’s not for lack of good, moral people or plentiful resources. Continuing to blame colonialism, when few Africans still alive were even children when African nations gained their independence, is counter-productive, and hides any explanation of what might actually be standing in the way of an African Enlightenment.

If you can’t identify the true nature of problems, you can’t solve them. So what stands in Africa’s way, do you think?

[And since you bring up (off topic) the slave trade, I will point out that slavery was more active on the African continent than anywhere else in the world, and was so for centuries before it was introduced into Europe and the Americas. Far more Europeans and Americans were taken as slaves in Africa than Blacks taken from Africa to the Americas. The Vikings were selling whites slaves to black Africans. Our war with the Barbary Coast nations was over Americans taken as slaves by the Muslims. Slavery was universally practiced since pre-history, and when it was finally outlawed in Europe and America in the nineteenth century, it continued in Africa, the Middle and Far East, and continues to this day in some places.]

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