Electric scooters are now a staple of our cities. But here’s how they can support your relocation to the countryside and save your pocket in the process…

An electric scooter is parked on a country road, as the sun sets.
An electric scooter is parked on a country road, as the sun sets.
Photography by Daniil Lobachev

The conversation around micromobility naturally focuses on urban travel, where city-dwellers are using scooters for trips they had previously taken by tube, bus, or taxi. But what about those looking to decamp to the country?

The big move

As we get older, city life can soon become all-consuming; the pollution, the pokey flats, the endless grey and gridlocked streets. At some point, you begin to long for the green grass of rural life. A recent estate agent survey said that 4 in 10 buyers are now considering countryside locations in the wake of coronavirus. …


Here’s how more e-scooters can inadvertently bring a sense of security to our city streets…

An almost empty street with a two-way bike lane in the city centre of Madrid.
An almost empty street with a two-way bike lane in the city centre of Madrid.

The phrase traffic calming is often used when talking about the impact of electric scooters on cities, and it’s the reason why so many believe that the e-scooter’s mass adoption will change our urban landscapes for the better. But what does traffic calming mean? And how exactly can e-scooters transform our concrete jungles into safer, greener environments?

What is traffic calming?

Simply put, it’s the process of making roads safer for cyclists and pedestrians through the use of physical design. Speed bumps and speed limits, warning signs and road writing, all of these are traffic calming measures. …


The pandemic has transformed our notion of what it is to share space… so will we be put off by the idea of renting a scooter now?

A Lime rental e-scooter stands alone on a city street.
A Lime rental e-scooter stands alone on a city street.
Photography by Claudio Schwarz

Commuting is in the midst of a revolution. The great cities of today’s world are dominated by a young and environmentally-conscious professional class, and more than ever they are turning to electric scooters as their primary way to get to work. It’s a trend that looks set to continue; when the dust settles from the Coronavirus crisis, will people want to force themselves into mucky tubes in poorly ventilated tunnels underground? Already offices are telling employees they should only return to worksites if public transport can be avoided. …


Many might believe that electric scooters are a recent invention. But there were scooters on the streets long before Limes, Birds, and Razors…

Four 20th Century postmen stand on their Autopeds, the electric scooters of their time.
Four 20th Century postmen stand on their Autopeds, the electric scooters of their time.
Photography by Topical Press Agency

The electric scooter has become synonymous with the word ‘rental’. In cities across the world, rental scooters litter pavements as people hop on and off these disposable machines. In an effort to fix this, Taur is developing the ultimate electric scooter for ownership — a scooter that’s portable while being built for safe riding. And while that might seem groundbreaking, history shows there has always been public appetite for affordable, roadworthy, power-assisted scooters. It’s a history that’s longer than many would think; so while Taur might be looking to the future of scooters, here we delve into their past.

The first electric scooter

When…


What does ‘nominal’ wattage actually mean, and why should regulators (and customers) take motor power ratings with a pinch of salt?

A masked delivery worker rides an electric scooter past a building.
A masked delivery worker rides an electric scooter past a building.
Photography by Norma Mortenson

At Taur, we’re looking to a future where ownership is back in fashion; where cities are tired of the disposable hop-on, hop-off scooter rentals littered across their pavements. Taur scooters’ are built to own; and unlike rental companies, our priority is for long-lasting engineering that balances performance with safety.

In our last blog, we warned regulators of the need to be wary when limiting e-scooters’ motor power. So this week, we thought we’d delve deeper into the science; why is motor power not a sufficient way of measuring a scooter’s performance? …


Limiting the motor power of electric scooters is not only problematic, but may also prove to be dangerous for all users of the road…

A man rides his electric scooter on a bridge.
A man rides his electric scooter on a bridge.
Photography by Denniz Futalan

Commuting is in the midst of a revolution. The great cities of today’s world are dominated by a young and environmentally-conscious professional class, and more than ever they are turning to electric scooters as their primary way to get to work. It’s a trend that looks set to continue; when the dust settles from the Coronavirus crisis, will people still want to force themselves into mucky steel tubes in poorly ventilated tunnels underground? Already offices are telling employees they should only return to worksites if public transport can be avoided. …


We were once concerned that legislation might be delayed but, after the Transport Secretary’s unexpected announcements, it seems things are speeding up…

UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps presents at the №10 lectern for the daily Downing Street briefing.
UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps presents at the №10 lectern for the daily Downing Street briefing.
Screengrab from the BBC

In our first post on the UK government’s ‘Future of Transport’ consultation, we discussed its likely impact on electric scooters. In what is being described as the ‘biggest shake-up of transport law’ in a generation, the Government clearly wishes to re-establish the UK as a world leader in transportation technology.

In our discussion, we voiced our concerns that the bureaucratic nature of Government might result in the legislation being delayed. …


It’s been described as the ‘biggest shake-up of transport law’ in a generation. But what is the regulatory review, and what will it mean for electric scooters?

A group of smiling protesters stand proudly with their electric scooters, skateboards, and unicycles outside Downing Street.
A group of smiling protesters stand proudly with their electric scooters, skateboards, and unicycles outside Downing Street.
Photography by Tim Horton

The UK has long been at the forefront of transport innovations which have changed the way we move around the world. The passenger railway, the commercial jet airliner and the underground metro system were all life-changing inventions birthed here.

But technology is always advancing and, as much as the Government wants the UK to remain a world leader in transportation, abiding by regulations as archaic as the Highway Act of 1835 is not exactly maintaining that momentum. …


The immediate effects of coronavirus are obvious, but will this outbreak finally make us realise that long-term change is possible?

A map shows the extent of the coronavirus outbreak.
A map shows the extent of the coronavirus outbreak.
Photography by Martin Sanchez

The immediate effects of coronavirus are obvious as they have disrupted the ways we consume, work, and travel. The general slowdown of the economy, interruption to supply chains, a drop in industrial production, the saturation of the health system, as well as the threat to many workers’ livelihoods are some of the negatives arising from the chaos. Yet it is not all doom and gloom.

There have also been positive aspects to emerge out of this, some easy to imagine and others far less expected. …


Can our cities ever evolve beyond their car-centric designs? And how much of an impact could micromobility have in shaping city life?

An endless stream of cars drive along a busy motorway.
An endless stream of cars drive along a busy motorway.
Photography by Alexander Popov

Our cities have dramatically changed over time and so have the ways we move around them. From hopping onto horse-drawn carriages to sharing public transport, and from cycling on bikes to cocooning ourselves in cars — all these transportation methods have had a remarkable impact on our cities’ designs.

However, it is predominantly cars that have ruled our roads over the past century, bringing with their rumbling engines a whole host of problems that our cities can no longer deal with, including congestion, noise and air pollution. Many cities, their citizens and authorities alike, know this needs to change. But…

TAUR

The electric scooter built for life in the city. Coming to Kickstarter October 20th. taur.com

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