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Indonesia-based journalist specialized in freedom and discrimination issues.

I can attend a meeting while naked and no one complains.

From a formal attire for a high-level rendezvous to a familiar stinky old pajamas for weekend, chances are we interact with clothes everyday. Those fashion magazines and fast fashion companies have taught us how to dress. Not only appropriately, but also according to seasons.

People say we should dress to express ourselves, not to impress others But still, we are accustomed to pick the best outfit and spend hours shopping for new ones.

This has never been about our skin and fabric only. Perhaps what often overlooked is the critical interplay laying in between. It is a deeply complex human aspiration about formality, conformity, and even nudity. …


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Indramayu, Indonesia — Many of her friends attend college, but Mimin spends her days raising her 1-year-old daughter.

That afternoon, at her relative’s house, she was taking care of her beloved one, playing with a small umbrella.

“My parents wanted to prevent extramarital pregnancy” said 23-year-old Mimin, explaining her reason of tying the knot so early.

As young as 16, right after graduating junior high school, she married her boyfriend of 2 years.

“I actually wanted to get a job first. But my parents were afraid of me being pregnant.”

She recalled that at schools, her parents were so worried about her relationship with her male then-classmate. Almost everyday she was told to protect herself from ‘unwanted things’, a very general Indonesian term referring to a taboo. …


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(Taken August) Yasmin Church in Bogor, Indonesia, has been shut down for almost 10 years by the city government due to pressure from Muslim groups, despite winning the case in the Supreme Court.

Indramayu, Indonesia — Many of her friends attend college, but Mimin spends her days raising her 1-year-old daughter.

That afternoon, at her relative’s house, she was taking care of her beloved one, playing with a small umbrella.

“My parents wanted to prevent extramarital pregnancy” said 23-year-old Mimin, explaining her reason of tying the knot so early.

As young as 16, right after graduating junior high school, she married her boyfriend of 2 years.

“I actually wanted to get a job first. But my parents were afraid of me being pregnant.”

She recalled that at schools, her parents were so worried about her relationship with her male then-classmate. Almost everyday she was told to protect herself from ‘unwanted things’, a very general Indonesian term referring to a taboo. …


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Several studies in Indonesia have found that child marriage is driven by culture, lack of education, and poverty.

In Pasekan district Indramayu, there only 2 senior high schools available. So if we live there, we need to walk roughly 30 minutes to get to the nearest school. We’ll follow the example journey.


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Several studies in Indonesia have found that child marriage is driven by culture, lack of education, and poverty.

We’ll see the economic situation here, and how that might affect people’s decision in marrying their young generation.


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Several studies in Indonesia have found that child marriage is driven by culture, lack of education, and poverty.

We’ll see the economic situation here, and how that might affect people’s decision in marrying their young generation.

https://youtu.be/F2xQ82tOdfg


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Many of her friends attending college, but Mimin spends her day raising her 1-year-old daughter.

That afternoon, at her relative’s house, she was helping her beloved one playing with a small umbrella.

“My parents wanted to prevent extramarital pregnancy” said 23-year-old Mimin, explaining her reason of tying the knot so early.

As young as 16, right after graduating junior high school, she married her boyfriend of 2 years.

“I actually wanted to get a job first. But my parents were afraid of me being pregnant.”

She recalled that at schools, her parents were so worried about her relationship with her male then-classmate. Almost everyday she was told to protect herself from ‘unwanted things’, a very general Indonesian term referring to taboo. …


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Waskenih, 42, child marriage survivor from Indramayu, Indonesia

Culture remains a significant factor in child marriage in Indonesia. Waskenih married at 14 because she should not refuse the first marriage proposal. This is her message.

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