Pretty sure MM’s character from Failure to Launch isn’t characteristic of a Millenial — more like a…
Beckie Woodfield
1

Stereotypes are not based on single individual’s characteristics, but on the most common characteristics seen in a general group. My observations are valid, as is the stereotype of Millennials as Snowflakes. There are always exceptions to stereotypes in each generation. Even within the “Greatest Generation” there were anti-war protestors and conscientious objectors who didn’t want to go to war, even after the Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor. But the 17–35 year olds of that day mostly put their country first, volunteered in droves to sign up for military service, made whatever sacrifices were necessary and gave it their best effort to win despite their fears, doubts and uncertainties. Sadly, that attitude is largely missing from Millennials; they are taught by their Socialist/Communist teachers in government schools that they individually are more important than this country, that it isn’t worth fighting for, and that Socialism and Communism are just as good economic systems as Capitalism, or even better.

Anyone who has lived through at least three generations in the US has observed this shift in values, traditions and patriotism; at 29 you cannot have observed it, and were never taught it, so you think this country has always thought as you do and has always held the same values as you. It has NOT, and this country is the poorer for it.

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