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Blockchain may still be discussed as a hot new topic by many, but it is already embedded in many real-world applications. In manufacturing, logistics, supply chain, transport, farming, food production, and more, the list is long and continues to grow. Distributed Ledger Technology is a tool not only for secure, decentralised transactions, but also for greater speed and efficiency. It seems there is no limit to the diversity of use cases.

Both the public and private sectors are pushing for greater use of blockchain. As blockchain permeates different areas of activity, an increasingly large part of the economy is linked to it. By 2025, as much as one-tenth of global GDP (the sum of the gross domestic products of all the countries) could be driven by blockchain. …


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When you own 51 percent of a company, you control it. Having 51 percent of the computing power driving a cryptocurrency increases your ability to control it too.

In recent so-called 51 percent attacks on certain cryptocurrencies, hackers have stolen large quantities of digital coins. More worrying still, in some cases the cost to control enough processing power has been peanuts — relatively speaking. Does this put your favourite cryptocurrency at risk?


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In a decentralized peer-to-peer system like a public blockchain, there needs to be consensus. The individual parts of the system need to agree on the history of the blockchain up until the present moment as well as on how to move forward since there is no central authority to assume responsibility over it.

That’s easier said than done. There is always a risk of misinformation or miscommunication between users, whether accidental or deliberate. …


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This article is part of the Advanced Blockchain AG blockchain blog.

Distributed Ledger Technology is set to amplify the already huge expectations we have for the self-driven, autonomously navigated, drink-and-driverless world of tomorrow, making the once human interactions between vehicles and their environments seamless and instantly available to the constantly communicating fleet of spaceships.

Cars*.


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This article is part of the Advanced Blockchain AG blockchain blog.

It may be hard to believe, but there are nearly 1.7 billion people without access to a bank account. According to the World Bank's financial inclusion database , the bank accounts remain at a staggering 22% of the world population.

That's at least 1 in every 5 adults.

The US Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation estimates that in 2015, 7% of the US population, about 9 million households, were unbanked.

Find out what blockchain can do to change this. Read the full article here:


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Photo by rawpixel.com

This article is part of the Advanced Blockchain AG blockchain blog.

A smart contract is a piece of software that executes under specific real world conditions, much like a regular paper contract. However, it does not require any overhead that goes into a physical contract in its creation or execution.

Smart Contracts and Transactions

When a client makes a financial transaction, he or she can do it digitally, without the need for an intermediary. Such smart contracts can be simple transactions that take place between individuals, or complicated, multi-party transactions involving many participants.

Imagine for example, that you want to rent an office space for a specific amount of time. This involves a contractual relationship. You pay a certain amount of money in exchange for the right to use the office space for a certain amount of time. This requires parameters, a set of rules that allow you to use the resource. …


Digging deeper into the world of autonomous agreements.

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Photo by Aaron Burden

This is a continuation from my last article; How smart are Smart Contracts?.


An introduction to the automated, self-executing, code-enforced world of the smart contract.

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Imagine you could replace your lawyer with a vending machine. It may sound daft at first but it’s a commonly used analogy when describing smart-contracts.

While standard contracts outline enforceable terms of a relationship, smart contracts enforce relationships using cryptography — and the possibilities are endless.

Originally taken mainstream by Ethereum, smart-contracts exist solely between permitted parties. They execute exactly as intended by their creators and bypass the need for middlemen, saving a substantial amount of time and conflict.

Robert A. Küfner

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