This forced mini jet lag seems to be fueling everything from stress and sleeplessness to a surge in car crashes

Two clocks, set at 2 o’ clock and 3 o’ clock.
Two clocks, set at 2 o’ clock and 3 o’ clock.
Photo: Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty Images

You’re not the only one losing sleep and ranting over the change to and from daylight saving time. A survey in July revealed that 63% of Americans support eliminating the seasonal time changes. The lost or gained hour of sleep has a lot of scientists and lawmakers peeved as well.

In fact, there’s a veritable war going on against this frustrating, outdated, and arguably ineffective and unhealthy artificial time warp, which, interestingly, has its very roots in efforts to battle real wars.

There was a time when the nation could fall back on the idea that daylight saving time made sense: saving energy during wartime or when oil prices skyrocketed in the 1970s. Fast-forward to 2020, and, well, this forced mini jet lag seems to be fueling everything from stress and sleeplessness to a surge in car crashes, with conflicting evidence on whether it saves energy. …

About

Robert Roy Britt

Explainer of things, science & health journalist, author, former editor-in-chief of LiveScience & Space dot com, seeker of a more just and equitable world.

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