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*** Warning — this post contains LOTS OF INFORMATION*** :)

One thing I’ve noticed is in Western thinking we often tend to disregard context. …


How to adapt our way of life to the new era of working from home

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A interview with Mike Raven, By J.Sale.

More and more people are working remotely. But whilst working from home or using tools such as Slack, Skype, Zoom, or other digital connectors, has proven hugely advantageous for many, it is not without its downsides. I spoke with Mike Raven, co-founder of Adaptai and experienced digital nomad, about the drawbacks and benefits of remote working and how it influences, and is influenced by, our adaptability.

‘I have experienced significant isolation and disconnect working remotely,’

he admitted. Mike started working remotely four years ago, after seeking to leave the city where he worked after a series of life-altering circumstances. He wanted to travel, explore, and get space. At first, he assumed he would have to quit his job. At the time, remote working was relatively new. But after hearing about Remote Year programs, he became interested in maintaining his current role if possible. It seemed too-good-to-be-true that there were people out there travelling and working. But he knew he wanted to do it. He was incredibly nervous about pitching the idea of him remotely working to his friend and (at the time) boss, Ross Thornley (who would later go on to become co-founder with him at Adaptai). However, the first thing Ross said when Mike raised the idea was: ‘We’ve got to find a way to get you on it.’ Mike smiles as he tells me: ‘There was no request for a business case or anything like that.’


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There is a great deal of anxiety around employability, skills, and future job prospects at the moment; the anxiety is not only understandable, but rational. According to the new IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) study, 120 million workers in twelve of the world’s largest economies may need to be retrained as a result of AI and intelligent automation. Other studies tell of an even more drastic story. McKinsey & Co’s 2017 report estimated 800 million jobs will vanish worldwide by 2030.

Needless to say, there is an emergent skills gap developing. The skills we have, that our educational institutions and training programs deem important, are not longer the skills that are most useful in the workplace. Coupled with this is growing insight into the difference between ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills. …

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