“What right do I have to speak up?”

“Why would anyone want to listen to me?”

“That was just luck, or the right place at the right time.”

“Everyone must already know that. I have anything new to add.”

If you’ve experienced negative self-talk that sounds like this, you too have felt impostor syndrome rear its ugly head.

Negative self-talk can be motivated by impostor syndrome. / CDN

What is impostor syndrome?

Impostor syndrome, common but often overlooked, is a type of “phoniness” we feel when we “believe that [we] are not intelligent, capable or creative despite evidence of high achievement,” writes Carl Richards for The New York Times.

While “highly motivated to achieve,”…


Have you ever read something and said aloud to yourself, “I’ll be damned!”? Last night, this happened to me.

Last night, I was reading Priya Parker’s book “The Art of Gathering” and I got to a section called ‘Etiquette Vs. Pop-Up Rules.’

In “The Art of Gathering,” Priya Parker says human gatherings tend to be “lackluster and unproductive — which they don’t have to be.” / Iowa Public Radio

In it, Parker discusses how:

“the etiquette approach to life is …imperious. It is the opposite of humble. It shows minimal interest in how different cultures or regions do things.

[It is] not interested in variety or diversity, or the idea of different strokes for different folks. At Junior Cotillion, we didn’t learn the dances of Compton, Spanish…


Have you ever read something and said aloud to yourself, “I’ll be damned!”? Last night, this happened to me.

Last night, I was reading Priya Parker’s book “The Art of Gathering” and I got to a section called ‘Etiquette Vs. Pop-Up Rules.’

In “The Art of Gathering,” Priya Parker says human gatherings tend to be “lackluster and unproductive — which they don’t have to be.” / Iowa Public Radio

In it, Parker discusses how:

“the etiquette approach to life is …imperious. It is the opposite of humble. It shows minimal interest in how different cultures or regions do things.

[It is] not interested in variety or diversity, or the idea of different strokes for different folks. At Junior Cotillion, we didn’t learn the dances of Compton, Spanish…


*Originally published on Ms. Magazine blog*

The 2018 midterms welcomed a huge crop of feminist fresh(wo)men who ran as feminists, won as feminists and then stood — or, rather, dressed–in solidarity with their feminist foremothers at the State of the Union in early February, wearing “suffragette white” outfits adorned with ERA YES pins.

That weekend, Saturday Night Live paid homage to them the only way they know how.

[Watch the whole video here]

“Once upon a time, there were women,” a narrator announces at the beginning of the “Women of Congress” spoof on a seventies-styled television series. “Then they became…


*Originally published on Ms. Magazine*

What will it take for news organizations to realize women’s voices matter? It’s the question resounding in the wake of new research from the Women’s Media Center (WMC) which found that, across all platforms, men receive 63 percent of bylines and credits, and women receive only 37 percent.

Across all media platforms, men receive 63 percent of bylines and credits; women receive only 37 percent. WMC’s reporting from 2017 shows similar numbers.

Divided 2019: The Media Gender Gap” marks the WMC’s latest biannual assessment of women’s standings as media writers, reporters, correspondents and anchors in news media. Unfortunately, their findings have remained largely stagnant since their first report on the same topic in 2017.

“The media is in a…


Looks like elementary school teachers have been on to something all along: Sitting in a circle is the best way to encourage sharing, even among grown-ups in the professional world.

Circles are a growing trend in the business community because these types of meetings give all participants a chance to be seen and heard, for each to share their perspective and hear from others.

Perhaps this is why a whopping 85 percent of people who have participated in a circle-shaped meeting say it’s had a positive impact in their lives.

The following are just some of the benefits participants in…


The paradoxical theory of change says people change by becoming more fully what they are, rather than by trying to become something or someone they are not. /McKinsey

When I was five, my parents got divorced. This was the first time I saw a therapist.

Years and several moves later, I remember having one of the most profound conversations of my young life. Coincidentally, I was sitting across from a different therapist named Amy.

Amy was this incredibly outrageous figure in my eleven-year-old life. She cursed, she wore her shoes on the sofa, she offered me candy at odd hours. She was a master at building the type of rebel culture a Type A++ girl like me needed to explore what was going on in my overly orderly…


Many aspects of progressive movements have succeeded in making changes to the social world and the media industry as a whole. But the continued existence of overcritical and misogynistic headlines proves the ongoing need for official journalistic guidelines to help newsrooms better represent women and avoid sexist coverage … so I made some. Check them out at How Not To Be Sexist: The Guidelines.

An Associated Press headline circulated in August that read “Ariana Grande belts Aretha Franklin standard in tiny dress.”

And it was the New York Post that accused Serena Williams of having “the mother of all meltdowns”…

Roxanne Szal

Before grad school for journalism, I was a middle-school writing teacher at a low-income school in Texas. I love writing, editing and creating content.

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