Letters to Secretary Clinton … Please ask your supporters to tone it down … #2

Dear Madame Secretary,

Here’s my second piece of unsolicited advice. My first suggested that you tone down your rhetoric. My second is that you ask your supporters to do likewise, especially President Obama.

Last week he declared that you were the most qualified person to ever seek the presidency. He went on to say that you were more qualified than he was and more qualified than your husband. I might quibble with his clarification, given my bias towards electing presidents who have held substantial prior executive responsibility. However, you are definitely more qualified than Senator Obama was when he ran for that office back in 2008. Indeed his most significant prior achievement was being elected Senator.

But as for your being the most qualified person ever to seek the presidency, that kind of hyperbole is so outrageous it could only be given poetic license if you were one of best liked candidates who ever ran for this highest elected position, which you definitely are not.

So President Obama was merely pandering to the millions of your most ardent supporters. Meanwhile millions of other voters, like me, who remembered their grade school lessons in American history were taken aback by such a gross insult to the revered memory of George Washington. Surely the Father of our country who led the successful War for Independence was more qualified than you are. Or how about Thomas Jefferson, another Founding Father who wrote the Declaration of Independence. Or Dwight Eisenhower who led the successful war against the Nazis in WW II.

No, Madame Secretary, you can merely claim to be the most qualified nominee of a major party seeking the presidency in 2016. That’s all that a majority of voters need to believe for you to win the election. President Obama’s hyperbole may inspire millions of Americans who don’t remember their history, but it only serves to remind millions of others of the limits of your prior experience as a leader.

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