GRIT

DETERMINATION, MOTIVATION, PERSEVERANCE, SUCCESS

AUGUST 29, 2016 LEAVE A COMMENT EDIT

When I was younger, Grit was something people around me talked about more than they do now. There were men and women in my small South-Texas town who were known to have “grit.” My grandfather and my Dad, really all my male relatives, would exhort me to “quit yer whinin’ and grow some grit.” We watched the John Wayne movie, “True Grit” and idolized his depiction of tough, Western sticktoitiveness.

Whatever the current word or term is today, Grit is a good thing to have. To get anything big or intimidating done, you gotta have some Grit.

As a personal trainer who is in the gym five days a week, over twelve hours a day, I run up against the lack of grit all the time. Outside of sports, mainstream and urban society has swung away from the ideas of sacrifice, especially when the alternative is sitting on the sofa streaming Netflix with a big bag of Doritos.

I see people come in month after month, making little to no progress toward their fitness goals because they lack grit and will not intensify their workouts. “I don’t want to work that hard,” is the excuse I hear the most.

But working hard is the clearest path to success–even more than talent. Michael Jordan says, “I’ve always believed, that if you put in the work, the results will come.” Even in a field outside the fitness realm, Colin Powell, former Secretary of State, says, ” A dream doesn’t become reality through magic, it takes sweat, determination, and hard work.” These are the components of grit.

What Powell says about dreams not coming about by magic, is an important statement. In there is the secret to improving your life in general and your Grit.

Talent and genius are seen as something one is “magically” born with. You either have it or you don’t. And to an extent–that’s true,but both talent and genius can be improved upon, no matter where you’re at on the scale now. You may not be the smartest person, but with work and practice, you can get smarter.

Grit scholar, Angela Duckworth is a MacArthur “genius” grant winner and author of the book, Grit. In her book she outlines how to build grit, and one of the most important elements is a growth mindset, which basically means a person believes she can build and strengthen traits like intelligence, talent, and grit that traditionally have been seen as static. Without that belief–no one tries to get better.

So, with a growth mindset, a woman can build her determination and perseverance to get gritty and as tough as a gymnasts’s hands–regardless of how much she possesses them now. By getting to work, she builds a better self.

With a growth mindset, a woman can build her determination and perseverance to get gritty and as tough as a gymnasts’s hands

So when you’re faced with troubles, a new, long-term project, a new career, twenty pounds to lose, or the birth of a child, remember that it is by the resilient power of grit that you wear down the obstacles in your way. Without grit–the obstacles wear you down. The barriers you face can be physical or mental, but either way you need more grit than the opposition.