MedCurbside is a new and experimental question/answer site for medical professionals and by medical professionals. We’re interested in seeing if pharmacists can also benefit from our site and would like your help in making it a great online resource and community for healthcare providers.

To that end, we need posts and feedback from pharmacists. So for a limited time we’ll be paying for questions and answers from providers like you!

Our target reimbursement for pharmacists is $80/hour: A high quality post (question or answer) takes roughly 15 minutes, so we’ll pay $20 per post.

3 steps to get started!

  1. Create an account

-Go to medcurbside.com


MedCurbside is a new and experimental question/answer site for medical professionals and by medical professionals. So, we are looking to our physician peers to help us make it a great online resource and community for healthcare providers. To that end, we need posts and feedback from physicians. So for a limited time we’ll be paying for questions and answers from docs like you!

Our target reimbursement for docs is $120/hour: A high quality post (question or answer) takes roughly 15 minutes, so we’ll pay $30 per post.

3 steps to get started!

  1. Create an account

-Go to medcurbside.com

-Click Register in the top right… just…


As I discussed earlier, this is a series of posts about an EMR/EHR implementation, with a focus on what it means for the business.

When you’re tracking a problem and working on a solution you’re doing the right thing; when you can’t even see the problem you’re in a bad place.

Physician order entry, non-paper records, electronic notes, etc. are NOT the reasons to have an EMR. They are mechanisms of achieving other primary goals…or they are byproducts of having an EMR (and sometimes they are bad byproducts, which should be selectively avoided).

We strive to provide excellent patient care…


Some Background

The physician group I work with is an independent, outpatient, interventional practice that has 6 pain management physicians, 2 interventional radiologists, 4 chiropractors, and about 150 employees.

We provide a wide variety of services including interventional pain management, physical therapy and chiropractic services, venous disease treatment, a growing number of interventional radiology treatments, and a number of ancillary services that go with it.

For context, the practice originally started as a single family-run clinic in the middle of nowhere with about 5 staff members, and grew rapidly over 10 years with more focus on expansion than business structure/operations/or IS systems.


Here’s a recap of how we will run a trial: Each group has its own trial (If you represent a group of doctors who we haven’t talked to… like a residency… and are interested, then contact us!). Within each trial we have a few special perks as a thank you for participating:

  1. Guaranteed free lifetime account for everyone who registers, even after MedCurbside leaves its testing phase.
  2. 1st prize: $400 cash for the user with the highest reputation (+ a NEJM subscription)
  3. 2nd prize: $200 cash for the user with the highest reputation (+ a NEJM subscription)
  4. 3rd prize: $100…


Have you ever thought about how physicians practice differently today compared to just a few decades ago?

I’m a 2010 med school graduate so my perspective on physician practice is biased by modern training. However, I, like many others, was trained by attendings that spanned several generations. So I often got glimpses into how medicine might have been practiced 10, 20, or 30 years ago.

While I can’t speak from personal experience, I often got the impression that the farther back you go the wilder medical practice was: residents having less oversight, young residents almost independently running ICUs, less consensus…


Noise and bias affect medical decisions. It’s an unfortunate reality. So it’s important to understand those effects and what steps we can take to reduce them.

This article from the Harvard Business Review discusses what they call “noise” in decision making:

Noise: How to Overcome the High, Hidden Cost of Inconsistent Decision Making

When pathologists made two assessments of the severity of biopsy results, the correlation between their ratings was only .61 (out of a perfect 1.0), indicating that they made inconsistent diagnoses quite frequently.

They first establish examples (and there are a lot) of how high level professionals, like…


Mary’s Room and Medical Education

The Mary’s Room thought experiment raises some ideas that are particularly useful when applied to medical practice and education.

I won’t review the whole thing here (watch the video for that), but here’s a summary of the possible situations Mary finds herself in (based on the thought experiment and the counterarguments):

  1. Mary knows everything academic about color but never experiences it (hence she learns something new in experience via “qualia”)
  2. Mary truly knew everything about color (hence the experience didn’t create any new knowledge)
  3. Mary never truly knew everything about color because not all…


In part 1 of this intro post I addressed the trouble with information management in medicine. There are 3 main points:

  1. There is a lot of available information in medicine (increasing breadth and depth of medical knowledge, many specialists, scientific studies, review articles, summary services, etc.).
  2. There is a poor distribution of information in medicine (classic curbsides are ephemeral, isolated, not shared or searchable. Economic, social, geographic, and temporal limitations affect how well one clinician can obtain information from another clinician).
  3. There are poor mechanisms to promote good information in medicine (curbsides aren’t validated by multiple providers, daily questions and…


Welcome to the inaugural blog post for MedCurbside! In order to understand our mission, it’s important to understand the problem MedCurbside is trying to solve. It’s a problem of growth of medical information without a matching advancement in information management tools.

This is part 1 of a 3 part intro series.

How it starts

Medicine, perhaps more than most fields, requires you to assimilate large amounts of information. If you’re a physician reading this, this is obvious to you. For any non-healthcare-provider readers, a couple facts to illustrate this point: A physician’s education is at least a 7 year path…

Rohit Puranik, MD

Physician and Founder of MedCurbside.com

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