When You Can’t Be the Person The Internet Wants You to Be
Felicia C. Sullivan
1.3K142

I’ve called years like you’ve had “character building” years. Seems kind of trite when I write it, but they were for me. My late wife fought hard against, then accepted her fate with, Huntington’s Disease. She became an unwitting emotional vampire. Many days seemed to just run into the next. Had some days I just wanted to just make it all go away. But there’s that voice that gets you out of bed and keep trudging through the mud until you finally reach solid ground. You will.

But what do you say online? Where’s the balance point? I think that point changes with society and our vision at the time. What we can only share in person now we’ll see on the Web somewhere soon, and it will be ok. Everyone has a different tolerance of what they want to see, or share. And god knows everyone will have an opinion about it. Whatever we put on the Net is forever, but most folks could care less about it 10 minutes later. Security in anonymity, and we take our chances. BTW, if a potential employer would balk about what they find out about you, it would be a good fit to work there anyway. Now, if you want to go into politics, that’s a different matter…

True friends are the ones you look at and wonder how, decades later, they are still around. You feel lucky to have them. They aren’t true because of any one, or few, things that happened. You just realize that, no matter what, it still feels good to be with them. You gain emotional energy from them, seemingly without effort, and they from you.

We all do the best we can at the time with the resources we have at hand. As we get older, parts of us get wiser while other parts of our perspective narrow. We need to encourage the former and prevent the latter. It’s a fun challenge.

It gets better. It has to. Oh, and for me, it’s not a bus. It’s just a car. Don’t know how I’d entertain more than a few.