Rubén Lozano

Rubén Lozano

Spaniard, front-end designer, husband, traveler, soccer fan, dog lover, open web enthusiast … becoming a full-stack web developer @launchschool

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In “Introduce Process Only As A Last Resort”, we look at how process often times helps the bad and hurts the good. Bad actors in an organization will figure out what the rules and the process are and follow them to a letter. Then they’ll find a way to slack off within these boundaries. Just as a hypothetical example, let’s look at working hours. Let’s say the company makes a new rule: “you have to be in the office from 9am to 7pm.” The bad actor will be at the office from 9am to 7pm. They might be on Facebook half of the day, but you didn’t make a rule against that, right? When it comes to performance review time, this bad actor can say “I followed all the rules & process! I was here from 9am to 7pm every day!” You’ve created a set of boundaries that they can hide within. Meanwhile, the good actor who is really giving it their all, might not show up until 10 or 11am, but they work until 10pm because they are really engaged. By the metric you are measuring, this good actor is not performing up to par. Who do you want in your organization? Meanwhile, if you remove this process, the bad actor starts showing up at 11am and leaving at 4pm. The good actor still shows up at 11am and works until 10pm because they still really care about what they are working on. It all of a sudden becomes very obvious who cares about the organization and who does not, thanks to the lack of rules & process and not because of them. It’s the same reason that communism does not work nearly as well as capitalism — things work best when you give people freedom as individual actors.