On the Huffington Post and paying bloggers
Matthew Keys
103

The issue about not paying “bloggers,” writers or contributors for their articles, submissions or posts (but making money off the traffic those “voluntary posts” have generated) is a very real challenge facing many a blogger. Exposure is one thing, and there are times where piggybacking your voluntarily-contributed content onto the audience of others may make good business or branding sense. Ultimately, the decision to submit one’s content knowing he/she/their business will receive no compensation is one that must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. But to blanket-approach a company-wide, no-payment blogger policy based on a ridiculous premise like the one Hull vomited out of his mouth about when somebody writes something for any publication WITHOUT being compensated, that must by default mean the writing “is real.” #WTF ?? Hull blabbers on by saying that because he does not “FORCE” the person to submit content ?? (Btw, how would you actually “force” someone to submit their content voluntarily anyways? Perhaps by holding a pistol emoji to their head??) then the content the person submits is surely to be far more “authentic.” How does someone like this hold a key editorial position, I’ll never know. But alas, reality sucks and so does this we-don’t-pay-bloggers-to-keep-their-submissions-authentic kind of thinking (or should I say, non-thinking?). Look, it’s one thing to say “Even though we make a gabillion of advertising dollars each year off of the voluntarily-submitted content we receive, we are incredibly cheap bastards and don’t compensate for ANY content you submit here. However, our sites garner high volumes of traffic and can result in getting you some great exposure if you’re interested.” At least that’s honest and forthright. But to premise it all by saying that paid contributors submit fake content which is why you don’t pay contributors ??? #SoundsLikeATonOfBullshitToMe

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