Windows 98 PC Build — Part 2, Sourcing

After the previous blog post I started to do some more research about what parts would be best.

I cam across PhilsComputerLab’s soundcard comparison for a Super Socket 7 build, The ISA Awe 64 came out pretty well apart from in some 3D audio games and also provides some of the best DOS game compatibility which is what I’m looking for.

This confirmed that I required a motherboard with a ISA slot and my decision was between a Slot 1 with Pentium III or Slot A with An Athlon. After looking around for quite a while I finally found a motherboard and athlon bundle which I won for a very decent price in my view. Resulting in a GA-71XE and AMD Athlon 700Mhz.

Along with this I needed RAM, I actually found that I had a stick of SDRAM which totalled 256MB.

For hard drive I had a few options, the motherboard has a maximum of 75GB support. So a 40 or 60GB HDD would be fine. However speed is also better to use either a CF card or SSD. However in the end I thought I would try a 256GB Sata Drive, this is my older Velociraptor Drive which is very fast for a mechanical drive. It also only meant it cost £2 for a Sata to IDE Adaptor.

I sourced a LAN card and a few other bits required such as the PSU.

Finally the Graphics, I had a look and Philscomputerlab had just under 2 hours of comparison between Nvidia cards, 3DFX Cards, ATI and some other brands. I was originally looking at a 3DFX Accelerator where you still have a 2D GPU which connects to the Accelerator and your motherboard connects to that. However while I’d like one of these, they’re only compatible with Direct 3D 3 where as some of the games I wish to run requires Direct 3D 7.

Currently I haven’t sourced one yet. I might have a couple on the way soon but we’ll see. A majority of the parts have arrived but I’m still waiting to start the build. A contender is the FX5200 which is newer than that but might be too new for the build.

Once the motherboard & CPU arrive I’ll then do the next blog post with possibly a video. Stay tuned!

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