Subbu Allamaraju

As I reflect on my experience working with or for some experienced managers in large companies, I realize how good some are at developing robust org structures that survive leadership changes or other challenges. That experience taught me a few valuable lessons about the implications of poor org designs. While I would defer to Matthew Skelton and Manuel Pais’s 2019 book Team Topologies for a collection of patterns on org design, I want to share what I learned.

Continue to read at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2022/on-vulnerability-of-orgs/.

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There are multiple parameters for choosing between career choices. Popular parameters include the total compensation, the type of work you will be doing, the team and the manager, the title and visible perks, a company’s social status, or even their declared purpose (“we’re the world’s blah”). But we generally overlook what’s underneath all these — the business model. I had to think hard recently about my parameters. The first criteria I came up with relates to the business model.

Continue to read at https://m.subbu.org/articles/2022/career-choices-and-business-models/.

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Here are three must DOs for interviewers based on my recent interviewing experience with several companies.

1. Be Present

Presence is the most important behavior for an interviewer. Don’t distract yourself during the interview. The candidate would know when your eyes wander off to check an email or a message on your screen. When that happens, you break the communication flow. Don’t let this happen. Stay in the full-screen mode and disable notifications on all your devices. If you are taking notes, let them know.

Continue reading at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2022/must-dos-for-interviewers/.

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Continuing from my previous article on managing yourself, another classic trap that impedes personal growth is endlessly playing self-made movies in your mind and believing in those plots. Let me describe a particular situation.

One evening, I got a call from an ex-colleague out of the blue. We’ve not spoken for years. He wanted to talk, and I said go on. He sounded upset and beaten. For the next ten to fifteen minutes, he gave me a crude sketch of what was going on at work with his current manager, the new manager, some details about how he felt about them, and some feelings of betrayal.

Continue at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2022/making-up-movies/.

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Data mesh is a nice wishy-washy set of ideas to improve the current state of data. The principles are based on sound reasoning and are well intended, but I find the story incomplete to transform the current state of data radically. There is plenty of money flowing into the industry. So there are companies to be funded, differentiated products to be built, customer segments to be carved out, conferences to be held, and we may still miss the opportunity to drive change.

Continue reading at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2022/dont-chase-data-mesh-yet/.

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Here are the top books that influenced me the most this year.

Positive Intelligence by Shirzad Chamine

My coach recommended this book late last year, and I picked it up this year. In this book, Shirzad provides a framework to quiet out the worst (the saboteurs) by naming them and revealing them. His framework helped me discover my saboteurs and recognize them quickly when I see them again. I recommended this book to several people in my circle this year. In my coaching sessions, I ask people to read this book and come back to tell me what they discovered and the justification lies they tell themselves when demonstrating certain behaviors. This exercise usually leads to several insightful conversations and aha moments for self-improvement.

Continue reading at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2021/2021-in-reading/.

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Asking for feedback can be challenging. It can be uncomfortable to know. It may force you to look at things that you would instead look past. What if there is a better way?

What if we consider that the feedback is already there, floating in front of us, nicely wrapped, and all we have to do is grasp it with our hands, and unwrap it to know what’s inside? What if we seek it like we seek anything new or unopened, with curiosity and no judgment of the giver as well as of the seeker, to see what others saw, to hear what others heard, and to know what others felt?

Continue reading at https://www.subbu.org/articles/2021/on-feedback/.

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